Friday, October 23, 2015

Revenge Of The Knox, The Smear-All Book: We Get Down To Nailing ALL Her Invented Claims #8

Posted by Chimera



Implacable nastiness - in NYC’s Central Park. Click here to go directly to Comments.

1. Overview Of This Series

My opinion is that this book is essentially Amanda Knox’s way of getting back at everyone in Italy she ever encountered, while falsely making her notoriously brash, sharp-elbowed, frequently drugged-up persona look endearing, naive, and squeaky-clean.

Knox includes numerous lies, smears, and stories to compromise literally dozens of others. In the first seven posts there are 350, many with several lies bundled together, and in this post I identify another 60 making the total 410 so far with more pending.

None of them help clear up what happened to Meredith.  And given how rampant the lies are, it doesn’t really clarify anything about Amanda Knox either. All it really does is to muddy the waters, which may be the real desired benefit.

This series is previewed and it’s explained why the “Revenge of the Knox” motif in this post here. The seven posts before this one can all be read here.

Page numbers are those of the expanded 2015 paperback.

2. Dissection Of Pages 313 to 354

[Chapter 26, Page 313]  After I was accused of murder, people read new meaning into everything about me. A hickey on my neck became a scratch from Meredith in her last, desperate moments. An awkward encounter about a dirty toilet became a murder motive. Male friends I brought home became mysterious lovers of questionable character. Rudy Guede’s aside to the guys downstairs about my being cute became proof that he would do anything to earn my attention and approval.

  • Okay, what did Sollecito use to give you that hickey?  His mouth?  Fingernails?  Knife?

  • Disingeuous, the toilet was just one thing in many of you being messy?

  • So who were these ‘’ male friends’’ if they weren’t lovers?  What were you doing?  Do you even know their names?

  • Guede thought you were cute.  Did you know this ‘‘before’’ Meredith’s murder?

[Chapter 26, Page 314]  It wasn’t necessary for any of these people to be right. It was enough for them to raise doubts, to make it seem that I was lying. They had to be only marginally convincing.  The thought that these witnesses might wow the jury and judges terrified me.

  • So Judge Massei writes up a 400 page report, and Judge Nencini a 350 page report of ‘‘marginally convincing’‘?

  • Wtnesses are not supposed to ‘‘wow’’ a jury and judge.  They are supposed to present what they saw or heard.

  • Why would it terrify you?  Do they know things you wish they didn’t?

[Chapter 26, Page 314]  But when he saw my picture in the paper a few days later, his memory was precise. “I recognized her as the same girl,” he said. When asked if the girl was in the courtroom, Quintavalle pointed at me. “It’s her,” he said. “I’m sure of it.” I’d gone to the little store once to pick up milk and cereal. Once. I’d never been in the back, where the cleaning products are apparently shelved.

  • So, you are accusing police of ‘‘coaching’’ a witness?

  • He spoke up and said it was you?  Was he speaking Italian?  Sorry to keep beating this dead horse.

  • You have such a poor memory about the time of Meredith’s murder, yet you are absolutely certain you only went there once—for cereal?  And you are absolutely certain that you only went to ‘‘certain parts’’ of the store?

[Chapter 26, Page 314] He [Quintavalle] hadn’t wanted to get involved in the murder case and had come forward only at the urging of a journalist friend in August 2008. I relaxed a little. The jury would see what was true and what wasn’t. The media purposely did not. “A New Hole Appears in Amanda Knox’s Alibi” and “Witness Contradicts Amanda Knox’s Account.” News stories like this infuriated my family and friends. But strangers, no doubt, would think, There goes Amanda, lying again.

  • That is not true at all, it was not a journalist friend that urged him to get involved?

  • Stories like this infuriated family and friends?  How?  Do any of them speak Italian?  Although present in court, could your family understand what was said?

  • Strangers would think you were lying?  Your own lawyers thought you were lying about being hit by police.

  • If people might think you are lying, was that the reason to hire a PR firm?  To set things straight?

[Chapter 26, Page 315]  Nara Capezzali was a widow in her late sixties who lived in an apartment building behind the parking lot across the street from our villa. She testified that she heard a scream between 11 and 11:30 P.M. “It made my skin crawl, to be honest,” she said.She was certain of the time because she took a nightly diuretic and always woke up around 11 P.M. to use the bathroom.

  • Interesting that you try to discredit her, but you and Guede (2 co-accused) had both confirmed Meredith screaming.

[Chapter 26, Page 315]  Before falling back asleep, she said she heard footsteps running up the metal stairs by the parking lot. “At almost the same moment,” she heard the crunching of feet on gravel and leaves coming from the direction of our driveway. Never mind that our driveway wasn’t gravel; it was mostly dirt. Meredith’s room was on the back of our house, as far as possible from Capezzali’s. The defense doubted that anyone could have heard these noises across a busy road and behind closed windows with double panes. But the prosecution clung to Capezzali’s account, which was a linchpin used to approximate Meredith’s time of death.

  • Yes, because after hearing a ‘‘skin-crawling’’ scream, most people would just head off to bed.

  • You say Meredith’s room was ‘‘at the back, as far as possible from Capezzali’s’‘.  Yet, you also say that she was ‘‘across the road’‘, so your qualifier doesn’t do much to discredit her.

  • Really?  The road was busy at 11PM on a holiday?  Interesting.

  • Of course the ‘‘defense doubted’‘.  It is their job to doubt things.

  • The scream was ‘‘the linchpin’‘?  I guess hearing screams that ‘‘make your skin crawl’’ are common there.

[Chapter 26, Page 316]  One of the few points on which the prosecution and defense agreed was that the police had made an inexcusable blunder shortly after the body was found. They prevented the coroner from taking Meredith’s temperature for hours, squandering the best chance to gauge her time of death. The second option—analyzing the contents of Meredith’s stomach—was far less reliable. The third—Capezzali’s memory—wasn’t reliable at all.

  • Body temperature can give a rough estimate of T.O.D., based on the ‘‘1 degree an hour’’ guideline.  But far from exact, regardless of what C.S.I. says.

  • Stomach contents, and analysing digestion, can give an estimate on how long since a person last ate until death.  A guideline, once again.

  • No medical examiner with any integrity, would ever give an exact T.O.D., but rather a range, or an estimate.  Scientists are not supposed to make claims they do not know for certain.

  • Capezzali’s memory is not reliable?  So, she frequently hears screams that make her skin crawl and forgot the date?  Or she could not have heard a scream from across the street that you and Guede both confirm happened? 

  • And, did Capezzali testify to ‘‘things her mind made up?’’  Wait, you make those types of claims.

[Chapter 26, Page 316]  There were many bad days during my trial. The worst was the afternoon when evidence was presented to establish the time of Meredith’s death. Since the judge had ruled that to protect Meredith’s privacy the press and public couldn’t see her autopsy photos, he cleared the courtroom of everyone who wasn’t directly involved in the trial. Pictures of Meredith’s dissected stomach were projected onto a screen like the kind used for home movies. I knew that if I looked, I’d have the same reaction as the juror who bolted for the ladies’ room. Even more devastating than the actual image of the stomach was knowing it was my friend’s.

  • Yes, the court was cleared when Meredith’s autopsy photos were shown.  Damn those courts to show the victim and her family a little consideration.

  • Considering that you publish personal details of Meredith’s sex life, I can see why this would bother you?

  • Were these ‘‘bad days’’ as there was less chance for scrutiny, or did you really want Meredith ‘‘put out there’’ like that?

[Chapter 26, Page 316]  Throughout the display, the prosecution delivered a primer on the human digestive system. We learned it takes about two to four hours to digest a meal. Meredith’s friends had said that they’d started dinner around 6 P.M. Since the food hadn’t yet passed into Meredith’s small intestine, my lawyers said she died between 9 and 9:30 P.M.-10 P.M. at the latest.  Any later and her stomach contents would have shown up in her small intestine. According toMeredith’s friends, she had gotten home at around 9 P.M.

  • ’‘Meredith’s friends’‘?  You really don’t like dropping names, do you?

  • The digestion rates are only estimates, not exact.

  • ’‘Around 6PM’’ is not exact, and could be 6:30, or 6:45 for all we know before she actually ate.  When you order meals, do they actually arrive right away?

  • Meredith had ‘‘partially digested’’ her meal, so your claim is a red herring

  • Of course ‘‘your lawyers’’ say things like that.  Doesn’t mean they are true.

  • Also, do you have an interpreter or are you following the trial in Italian (in real time)?

[Chapter 26, Page 316]  On the only computer the police hadn’t fried, Raffaele’s laptop, the hard drive showed that we’d finished watching Amelie and clicked Stop—the last “human interaction” th the computer—at 9:15 P.M. The tight timing gave us an alibi that even the prosecution didn’t try to disprove.

  • An alibi how?  Even by your ‘‘version’’ of events, your last ‘‘human interaction’’ on the computer is 9:15PM, and Meredith could have been killed as late at 10:00PM.

  • Your flat is a few minutes away from Sollecito’s.

  • And in Sollecito’s November 5th/6th statement, he says he went out from 9PM to 1AM, and he doesn’t know where.

  • You yourself write statements saying you were at your home, covering your ears to drown out Meredith’s screams.

[Chapter 26, Page 317]  What made their theory even weaker was Capezzali herself. She testified that the morning after she heard the scream, some kids ran by while she was cleaning her apartment and told her a girl in the villa had been killed. Then, at around 11 A.M., when she went out to buy bread, she saw posters with Meredith’s face at the newsstand.

  • The problem: Meredith’s body wasn’t discovered until after 1 P.M. on November 2. When Mignini asked Capezzali if she might have heard the scream on Halloween and not on November 1, she snapped, “I don’t remember these things, these hours, these things. I don’t remember them anymore.”

  • I was sure there was no way the jury would put their faith in someone who said she didn’t remember.

  • Knox is trying to smear Capezzali as unreliable, and Mignini as coaching her, but misses the point. 

  • Obviously the poster wasn’t up PRIOR to Meredith being discovered, but if Mignini were to lead the witness, it would have made far more sense to ask if Capezzali had seen the poster on November 3rd or 4th, to have the story make sense

  • Juries are not supposed to believe witnesses with memory problems, just defendants?  Okay ....

[Chapter 26, Page 317]  The basketball court was made to order for the prosecution. The most direct walk from Raffaele’s apartment to my villa was through Piazza Grimana. It was also the place where Rudy Guede was known to play pick-up games and hang out. It was where Id once tried to shoot hoops with the guys from down-stairs and ended up watching from the sidelines. I hadn’t argued with anyone there, and I’d never been back, but what if the jury bought this guy’s story?

  • The most direct walk to your ‘‘boyfriend’s’’ home is through Piazza Grimana where Guede plays?

  • You admit you have been there with the men from downstairs?

  • Oh, wait, you have never crossed paths with Rudy Guede

[Chapter 26, Page 320]  I dreaded Patrick Lumumba’s testimony for his civil trial. It still gnawed at me that I’d never apologized to him. I was sure the man I’d wrongly named would rail against me. He had told the media that he would never forgive me, he’d lied about firing me, and he had called me “a lion,” “a liar,” and “a racist.” His lawyer, Carlo Pacelli, had called me “Luciferina” and said I had “an angel’s face with a demon’s soul.”

  • He didn’t lie about firing you.  He was going to replace you for being lazy

  • You never apologized to him?  Did you ever try?

[Chapter 26, Page 320] He was also far more forgiving than I’d expected. I wasn’t the best waitress, but I was a fine person, he said.I can only guess why Patrick had decided to tone down his anti-Amanda commentary. Either he felt he had to be honest under oath or his lawyer had advised him to act meek and likeable—and let the venom be rained down by Pacelli himself. Whatever the reason, Patrick told the court, “We always had a good relationship.”

  • You weren’t acting like a waitress at all?  You were flirting with everyone instead of working.

  • You always had a good relationship?  Was that before or after you had him falsely arrested?

  • He had ‘‘to be honest under oath’‘, so now he suddenly starts saying nice things about you?

[Chapter 26, Page 321] Then it was my turn. At first my lawyers said letting me testify was a risk. I could be provoked.  They worried the prosecution would push me to unwittingly say something incriminating. I’d fallen for Mignini’s word-twisting when he interrogated me in December of 2007. I’d dissolved into tears at my pretrial.

  • But I was adamant. “I’m the only one who knows what I went through during the interrogation,” I told Luciano and Carlo. “Having you defend me isn’t the same as defending myself. I need to show the court what kind of person I am.”

  • I felt it was crucial that I testify. I wanted to talk about my relationship with Meredith. I needed to explain my behavior in the wake of her murder.

  • Raffaele didn’t testify. That may have been the right choice for him. Most of the media attention had landed on me-Raffaele was seen as someone who had gone along with his evil girlfriend.

  • Yes, your lawyers don’t want you to say anything (else) incriminating?  Good call.

  • ’‘Showing the court what kind of person I am’’ isn’t the reason people should testify.  It is to have your version of events heard.

  • You wanted to talk about your relationship with ‘‘your friend’‘?  You mean, it hadn’t soured, as others testified to?

  • Yes, conflicting alibis, lies, false accusations, etc .... do need to be cleared up

  • Sollecito didn’t testify.  In fact, he would never take the witness stand.

  • Knox however, did not agree to full cross examination.  The questions (agreed in advance), were limited to the ‘‘calunnia’‘.

[Chapter 26, Page 322]  In testifying, I wanted to make a point: You guys make me sound like I was crazy that I found three droplets of blood in the bathroom sink and didn’t call the police immediately. But I was a twenty-year-old who handled the situation the same way a lot of inexperienced people would have. It’s easy to look back and criticize my response, but when I went home that day I didn’t know there had been a break-in or a murder. To me, it was a regular day. Yes. The door was open. But I’d known since I moved in that the lock was broken. Maybe it was a cause for concern, but I just figured one of my roommates was taking out the trash or had run to the corner store. I was focused on getting ready for our romantic weekend in Gubbio. My thoughts were mundane. I’ll grab a shower. I’ll pack. I’ll get back to Raffaele’s, and we’ll go.

  • It was not ‘‘3 droplets of blood’‘.  The bathroom was soaked in blood.

  • And what about the ‘‘unflushed toilet’’ you wanted everyone to know about?

  • And that broken window (Filomena’s), facing you as you walk towards the house?

  • You were excited for Gubbio, but then just forget all about it?

  • This is all academic though.  The questioning was restricted to the police interrogation (Nov 5th/6th).

[Chapter 26, Page 323]  I knew Mignini liked to intimidate people. I gave myself a pep talk. He scared and surprised you the first and second times. But three times? I don’t think so!

As the date got closer, I slept little and talked less. Journalists reported that I was pale and had dark circles under my eyes.

True. I was wearing my anxiety on my face. The day before I had to testify, a nasty cold sore appeared on my lip. My mantra for myself ran through my mind. You are not afraid. You are not afraid of Mignini. This is your chance.

When I saw the prosecutor in court, Mignini seemed like a blowhard in a silly robe. I wished I had felt that way when he questioned me before.

  • Yes, Mignini intimidated you by telling you to seek legal advice before answering potentially incriminating questions.

  • The second time?  Is that when you had legal counsel, and the ever elusive Giancarlo Costa was one of your lawyers?

  • Mignini seemed ‘‘like a blowhard in a silly robe’‘?  Good to know you take this seriously?

[Chapter 26, Page 323] The first person to question me was Carlo Pacelli, Patrick’s lawyer. Lawyers technically aren’t allowed to add their own commentary at this point, only to ask questions. But he made his opinions known through pointed questions like “Did you or did you not accuse Patrick Lumumba of a murder he didn’t commit?” and “Didn’t the police officers treat you well during your interrogation?’‘

The lawyer looked disgusted with me. I sat as straight as I could in my chair and pushed my shoulders back—my I-will-not-be-bullied stance.

Within a few minutes I realized that the interpreter hired to translate my English into Italian—the same useless woman I was assigned earlier in the trial—wasn’t saying precisely what I was saying.

  • Pacelli isn’t giving commentary.  He is asking pointed questions.  This is a murder trial.

  • Looking disgusted qualifies as ‘‘bullying’‘?  Okay.

  • Useless?  She was hired by the court to help you.

  • The interpreter isn’t saying precisely what you are saying?  Do you mean her translation isn’t word for word, or she is off of the content?  Or is she not being as evasive as you hoped she would be?

  • And when asked questions in Italian, you answer in English, and have the translator go English-to-Italian in return?  Why do this?  Are you hoping for mis-communications to be made?

  • If you don’t need her, why not just have the questioning completely in Italian?

  • Note: 323-327 is Knox’s account of her testimony.  In reality, she was on the stand June 12th and June 13th.  Notice that she is never questioned about the evidence of the murder.  The scope of the questioning was limited beforehand.

[Chapter 27, Page 329] Carlo [Dalla Vedova] leaned across the table in the visitors’ room. “Amanda,” he said. “They’re wrong!”  His customary pessimism had vanished. “There was no blood on the knife,” he said. “And there was so little DNA present they didn’t have enough to get valid results. We have everything we need to overturn the case!”

  • This conversation likely never took place, and if so, Dalla Vedova is truly incompetent.  There was plenty of evidence, both forensic and non-forensic to tie Knox and Sollecito to the crimes.  This knife was not a make-or-break.

[Chapter 27, Page 330]  That had been in September 2008. By then it was July 2009. Ten months had passed. On the day the court recessed for the summer, Judge Massei ordered the prosecution to give us the data. They still held back some information, but within the papers they did give us, our forensic experts found the prosecution had failed to disclose a fact that should have prevented us from ever being charged. There was no way to tie this knife—and therefore, me—to Meredith’s murder. I’d always known that it was impossible for Meredith’s DNA to be on the knife, and I’d long known that the prosecution had leaked assumed evidence to the media. Now I knew that these mistakes weren’t missteps. Stefanoni and her team had made giant, intentionally misleading leaps, to come up with results designed to confirm our guilt.

  • Knox claims the prosecution withheld evidence that would exonerate her.  Serious charge to make.

  • How do you know that it was impossible to have Meredith’s DNA or it?  Did you clean it, or use a different knife?

  • It had Meredith’s DNA on the blade, yours in a groove in the handle, (the double-DNA knife).  Seems pretty conclusive.

  • So, Stefanoni commits misconduct, lies about, and leaks false results?  Did you ever file a complaint?

[Chapter 27, Page 330]  Carlo, who’d never sugarcoated my situation, said, “These are small-town detectives. They chase after local drug dealers and foreigners without visas. They don’t know how to conduct a murder investigation correctly. Plus, they’re bullies. To admit fault is to admit that they’re not good at their jobs. They suspected you because you behaved differently than the others. They stuck with it because they couldn’t afford to be wrong.”

  • Earlier you quote Dalla Vedova as saying the detectives don’t know what to do, as they haven’t had a murder to investigate in 20 years.  Yet, you refer to your home and town as a ‘‘deathtrap’‘.

  • Dalla Vedova claims they are incompetent, and withhold information to cover up their mistakes?  Did he ever say this publicly?

[Chapter 27, Page 331]  And for Mignini, appearing to be right superseded everything else. As I found out that summer, the determined prosecutor had a bizarre past, was being tried for abuse of office, and had a history of coming up with peculiar stories to prove his cases. His own case is currently pending on appeal.

  • Update on that: the appeals court (and Cassation), ruled that the charges were baseless and threw them out.

[Chapter 27, Page 331]  Mignini had a habit of taking revenge on anyone who disagreed with him, including politicians, journalists, and officials. His usual tactic was to tap their telephones and sue or jail them. The most famous instance was the arrest of Italian journalist Mario Spezi, and the interrogation of Spezi’s American associate Douglas Preston, a writer looking into the Narducci case, who subsequently fled Italy.

In the hour we had each week to discuss my case, my lawyers had never thought there was a reason for us to talk about Mignini’s outlandish history. Carlo and Luciano told me only when it became apparent that, for Mignini, winning his case against Raffaele and me was a Hail Mary to save his career and reputation.


“The whole story is insane!” I said. I couldn’t take it in. It struck me that I was being tried by a madman who valued his career more than my freedom or the truth about Meredith’s murder!

  • Mignini is required to file complaints about people who make false accusations.  Otherwise the prosecutor’s office could easily be pushed around.

  • Doug Preston was interrogated by Mignini?  Explains a lot about one of your ‘‘allies’‘.

  • Yes, lucky for Mignini’s career that Meredith happened to come along and get killed.

  • ’‘It struck you that you were being tried by a madman’‘?  Did telling all those lies ever strike you as the reason for being tried?

[Chapter 27, Page 332]  Giulia Bongiorno made a speech that gave me even more cause for optimism. Keeping the raw data from us until July 30 had violated our rights as defendants. If we’d had it earlier—when we first requested it—it would have altered the trial from the beginning. “The question for the court,” Bongiorno said, “is the DNA evidence decisive or not? If you believe it’s not, then there hasn’t been an injury to the rights of the defense. But if the DNA is decisive, you have to ask yourselves: Did the defense have the possibility to examine the data to be able to counter the conclusions? Did the defense have the diagrams, the electropheragrams, the quantity of DNA, the procedures? You have the answer.

  • So, either the DNA is conclusive or it is not.

  • If it is conclusive, then, it must be contaminated.

  • If it is conclusive, then the defences should have been able to examine it, and to witness

  • Reality: defence lawyers WERE given the chance to be present, but chose not to, so they could later claim contamination.

[Chapter 27, Page 332]  Our lawyers’ arguments stirred up all my outrage. The prosecution had kept Raffaele and me in jail for twenty-one months for no reason. If the judges and jury were fair, they’d see that the prosecution had tried to thwart us.

  • Yes, the prosecutors are trying to thwart you by having defense lawyers choose to not attend DNA testing.

[Chapter 27, Page 332]  Adjusting his glasses, Judge Massei droned in his unassuming voice, “There will be no annulment.  We’ll hear both sides discuss the forensic evidence.”  I swallowed hard and closed my eyes, willing my tears back in their ducts.

  • Massei droned?  Way to take pot-shots at the lead judge.

  • Silly Massei.  Wanting to hear both sides before making a decision.

[Chapter 27, Page 334]  No one was contesting the brutality of Meredith’s death—only how it had happened and who was responsible. Everyone believed that Rudy Guede had been there and that he had killed Meredith. He was already serving a thirty-year sentence for her sexual assault and murder.

The goal of the prosecution was to prove that I had been there, too.

  • Originally you, Sollecito and Guede were to be tried together.  But Guede asked for a short form trial when you and Sollecito teamed up against him. 

  • For some reason, short-form trials go quicker than full trials.

[Chapter 27, Page 334]  During the testimony phase, from January to July, witnesses discussed everything from my housekeeping habits to my character and sexual activity. It was intensely personal, and sometimes mortifying.

  • Mortifying?  Really?  Have you read your own book?  You splash around everyone’s secret’s true or false.

[Chapter 27, Page 334]  Picking up after the summer break, the forensics phase lasted only three and a half weeks, but it was still interminable: hour after hour of examination and cross-examination. Witnesses were called to talk about the knife, the bra clasp, my “bloody” footprints, how my DNA could have mixed with Meredith’s blood in the bathroom, and our alleged cleanup of the villa. Each expert explained how the evidence was found and documented, how results were calculated and interpreted. They were dissecting a crime I hadn’t committed, blaming me using terminology I didn’t know. I felt like an observer at someone else’s trial. The experts would say things like   “Amanda’s DNA was on the knife handle,” and I would think, Who is this Amanda?

  • Huh?  I thought there was no forensic evidence against you.  Okay.

[Chapter 27, Page 334]  I’d rest my chin in my hand, trying to look contemplative—a skill I’d developed during boring college lectures. But no matter how hard I tried to focus, my attention would wander, my head.  would bob, and the agente standing behind me would awaken me to the nightmare. More than feeling embarrassed, I was terrified that my inattention would be interpreted as my not caring and become another mark against me—even though some of the jurors also habitually dozed off.

  • Wow, you are comparing your murder trial to college lectures

  • Why are you having trouble focusing?  Is it that boring to hear about these things?

  • You are terrified about being seen as not caring?  Your behaviour in court would contribute more to that (All You Need Is Love?)

  • The jurors dozed off regularly?  Can I assume that you put that in your appeal?  No ... ?!

[Chapter 27, Page 335]  When testimony wasn’t dull, it was disturbing. I couldn’t stand thinking about Meredith in the starkly clinical terms the scientists were using to describe her. Did her bruises indicate sexual violence or restraint? What did the wounds to her hands and neck suggest about the dynamics of the aggression? What did the blood splatter and smears on the floor and armoire prove about her position in relation to her attacker or attackers?

  • Turn that first sentence around.  ‘‘When testimony wasn’t disturbing, it was dull.’‘

  • You can’t think of Meredith in those terms?  In May 2014, you told Chris Cuomo Meredith was a ‘‘corpse’’ and a ‘‘body’‘.

  • Yes, bruises indicating ‘‘restraint’‘.  Kind of suggests there were ‘‘multiple attackers’‘.

  • You seem rather interested in blood spatter and smears. 

[Chapter 27, Page 335]  The hearings were tedious, gruesome, and enormously upsetting. But we were no longer at the crippling disadvantage we’d been at for two years. Now that the prosecution had been made to show their notes, testing, and some of the raw data, we finally had facts. And the facts supported what I had always known: Raffaele and I had had nothing to do with Meredith’s murder. Meredith had never come into contact with Raffaele’s kitchen knife. I hadn’t walked in her blood.

  • The hearings were upsetting?  To you or to the Kerchers?

  • You know, the defence lawyers could have had the data and seen the testing, but they refused to attend.  Makes it difficult to claim ‘‘contamination’’ if it is done in front of them.

  • So, the evidence and facts were never shared with you?  So what information did Cassation rely on in 2008 to deny house arrest?

  • You say that the facts supported you and Raffaele having nothing to do with the murder.  Which facts in particular?

  • Meredith never came in contact with Raffaele’s knife?  Why did he invent a story about Meredith pricking her hand while cooking?

  • You hadn’t walked in Meredith’s blood?  Were you hopping?  Bathmat shuffling?

[Chapter 27, Page 335]  On the witness stand, Marco Chiacchiera of the Squadra Mobile had explained that “investigative intuition” had led him to the knife. That flimsy explanation did not help me understand how the police could pull a random knife from Raffaele’s kitchen drawer and decide that it was, without the smallest doubt, the murder weapon. Or why they never analyzed knives from the villa or Rudy Guede’s apartment.

  • Okay, let’s hear this ‘‘flimsy explanation’’ that you refer to, and we can decide for ourselves.

  • One of the knives had left a distinct imprint on Meredith’s bedsheet.  Police were looking for knives that could possibly match.  Why lie?

[Chapter 27, Page 336]  Then we heard the prosecution’s hired forensic experts describe the knife as “not incompatible"with Meredith’s wounds.  I wasn’t the only person who was perplexed. The experts debated the meaning of this phrase as intensely as they did the physical evidence being presented. During cross-examination, Carlo demanded, “‘Not incompatible?’ What does that even mean? If the knife was compatible, wouldn’t you have written ‘compatible’? You wouldn’t have bent over backward, twisting words around to create this ambiguous meaning. ‘Not incompatible’? Am I to understand, perhaps, that the confiscated knife is ‘not incompatible’ if only because it’s a pointy knife with a single sharpened edge? Am I to understand that any pointed knife with a single sharpened edge—most knives—would equally qualify as ‘not incompatible’ with Meredith’s wounds? Yes?”

  • Knox is being facetious here, at best.  It is virtually impossible to conclusively tie a specific knife to am injury, especially if the body had undergone any decomposition.  You can however, exclude potential weapons.  What was being testified to was that the smaller knife (Sollecito’s) could not be ruled out

[Chapter 27, Page 336]  The third and fatal wound was a gash to the throat. The pathologist said Meredith had been stabbed at least three times in the same spot.

  • This is extremely confusing.  The 3rd wound was fatal, meaning that the first 2 would not have been.  So, if Meredith was stabbed at least 3 times in the same spot, would these not be the 3rd, 4th, 5th (and possibly 6th or 7th stab wounds)?

  • Or does Knox mean that Meredith was stabbed 3 times in the exact same place, and that the third time was fatal?

[Chapter 27, Page 336]  Under Carlo’s questioning, Professor Torre, a serious man in his sixties who favored lime-green glasses, explained that in a moment of homicidal frenzy, it would be highly unlikely for a killer to plunge a knife in only halfway, to 3.149 inches. And the odds would rise to impossible when you considered driving a knife in, to precisely the same depth, measurable to a thousandth of an inch, three times in a row.

  • Why refer to Professor Torre as a ‘‘Serious Man’‘?  Is that praise for him, or insults at other experts?

  • Actually, as a knife goes deeper it does get harder to push in.  More surface area in contact with knife means more resistance.  Would you like to borrow a physics textbook?

  • Seriously?  The killer plunged the knife 3 times the exact same depth in the exact same location?  The killer has that level of control, yet wasn’t able to drive the knife in deeper?

  • Can you refer to where the police/prosecutors claim 3 identical stab wounds?  That information is news to me.

[Chapter 27, Page 337]  Torre brought in a foam bust and an exact copy of the knife to demonstrate how implausible this feat would be. I thought it was a good idea, but I couldn’t watch anyone stab anything—even a dummy. The notion that anyone thought I could have done that to a person—to my friend—made me not just heartsick but feeling like I might throw up. I squeezed my eyes shut.

  • Again, why are you trying to simulate 3 identical stab wounds?  That was never claimed by the prosecution.

  • Besides, a knife doesn’t have to go it all the way.  It can strike a bone, or the killer could be new to killing.

[Chapter 27, Page 337]  At the next hearing Manuela Comodi, the co-prosecutor in charge of forensics for the trial, swept into the courtroom triumphantly carrying a flat cardboard box, a little smaller than the ones used for carryout pizza. After opening it, Comodi paraded it in front of the court, as though she were displaying the queen’s jewels. Her pride showed on her face as the jurors and experts stood up, straining in her direction to get a good look at what was inside—the knife that had been confiscated from Raffaele’s apartment was wrapped in a baggie. Only Comodi was allowed to touch it, to pick it up and hold its plastic-shrouded blade up to the light.  Her theatrics were exasperating.

  • Is this a strange attempt at humour?

  • ’‘A box a little smaller than the ones used for carryout pizza’‘?

  • Comodi ‘‘paraded it in front of the court’‘?

  • As if ‘‘she were displaying the Queen’s jewels’‘?

  • ’‘The pride showed on her face’‘?

  • ’‘Only Comodi was allowed to touch it’‘?

  • Comodi’s theatrics?

[Chapter 27, Page 338]  During the pretrial, Stefanoni testified that she had tested enough DNA from the knife to get an accurate reading. But now, a year later, Dr. Gino had seen the raw data, including the amount of DNA that was tested. If there was any DNA there at all, it was too little to determine using the lab’s sensitive instruments, Gino said. Stefanoni had met none of the internationally accepted methods for identifying DNA. When the test results are too low to be read clearly, the protocol is to run a second test. This was impossible to do, because all the genetic material had been used up in the first test. Moreover, there was an extremely high likelihood of contamination in the lab, where billions of Meredith’s DNA strands were present.

  • So, DNA tests are conducted, but now your expert claims (if there is any DNA), it is too little to be tested?

  • So, which international standards were not met?  This sounds impressive, but please be more exact.

  • If there is little DNA, the protocol is to run MORE tests?  Makes sense

  • You claim contamination is the lab.  Any precise information on the exact route of contamination?

  • Dalla Vedova/Ghirga and Maori/Bongiorno could have been present during previous testing, but then, how would they explain ‘‘errors’’ going on under their noses?

[Chapter 27, Page 339]  What I couldn’t understand was why this infinitesimal, unconfirmed sample found on a random knife that didn’t correspond with Meredith’s wounds or the bloodstain on the bedsheet—the murderer’s signature— held any sway. Copious amounts of Rudy Guede’s genetic material had been found in Meredith’s bedroom, on her body, in her purse, and in the toilet.

  • Well, bleaching a bloody knife tends to destroy most of the DNA.

  • And a knife doesn’t have to ‘‘go in all the way’’ to be the murder weapon.

  • Yes, why bother with this small DNA amount, when there were 5 large mixed blood samples of you and Meredith.  Oh wait, you lived in that house for a month.

  • And of course, the police found Guede’s DNA in Filomena’s room (the break in point)?  No, just yours mixed with Meredith’s.

  • Correct, Rudy’s crap was found in the toilet, the toilet that anyone else in the world would have flushed immediately.

[Chapter 27, Page 339]  The situation was similar to the prosecution’s claim throughout the investigation, the pretrial, and now the trial that my feet were “dripping with Meredith’s blood.” My lawyers and I had spent hours trying to figure out why they thought this. We knew that investigators had uncovered otherwise invisible prints with luminol. Familiar to watchers of CSI, the spray glows blue when exposed to hemoglobin. But blood is not the only substance that sets off a luminol reaction.

Cleaning agents, bleach, human waste, urine stains, and even rust do the same. Forensic scientists therefore use a separate “confirmatory” test that detects only human blood, to be sure a stain contains blood. Had the Polizia Scientifica done this follow-up test? Under cross-examination during the pretrial, Stefanoni was emphatic. “No,” she responded.

  • Okay, even if it were another substance, why is it in the shape of your feet and Sollecito’s feet?  What was on the floor that you were tracking from Meredith’s room?

  • If it was a cleaning agent, or rust, why weren’t other people’s footprints found in it?

  • Why is this ‘‘other substance’’ limited to 2 of your footprints, and 2 of Sollecito’s?

  • If Guede left, as his shoeprints indicate, why did he leave a bare bloody print on the bathmat?

  • Also, how did Guede leave the footprint on the mat, but none in the hall?  Can ‘‘Spider-Man’’ fly?

[Chapter 27, Page 340]  As with the knife, it turned out that Stefanoni’s forensics team had done the TMB test and it came out negative. There were footprints. But they could have come from anything—and at any time, not necessarily after the murder. What matters is that there was no blood.

  • With a good ‘‘scrubbing’‘, the TMB tests would have been irrelevant anyway.

  • Yes, but they were your footprints, and Sollecito’s, and there were no one else’s that reacted.  So, you 2 had stepped in something, very recently.

[Chapter 27, Page 340]  November 2. Of course my DNA would be mingled with Meredith’s in the common hallway between our bedrooms—we’d lived in the same house and walked on the same floor tiles for six weeks.

The prosecution had no evidence against us, and worse yet, they’d withheld information likely to prove our innocence.

More infuriating was that Stefanoni continued to argue the prosecution’s inaccurate points during cross-examination.

  • So, the forensic evidence is irrelevant because you and your lawyers say it is?  Let’s get you out right away then.

  • Things like repeated false alibis, making false accusation, and repeatedly lying are not evidence against you?  Most think it is.

  • Yes, it is frustrating that prosecution witnesses do not automatically agree with half-truths from the defence.

[Chapter 27, Page 342]  Had Raffaele been in the room, his DNA would have been as abundant as Guede’s. It would be illogical to suggest that it was left on a single small hook on Meredith’s bra and nowhere else.  Furthermore, one of Raffaele’s defense experts pointed out that the genetic profile was incomplete, and could have matched hundreds of people in Perugia’s small population.

  • Merely being in a room doesn’t result in an abundance of DNA

  • It doesn’t mean everything was tested for DNA.  If an area was dusted for fingerprints, DNA testing would not be possible on that spot

  • The result was 17 of 17 loci, which was very conclusive

  • Interesting argument.  There is none of Raffaele’s DNA.  If there was, it was due to contamination.  And even if so, it could have been anyone’s.

  • And contaminated from what?  If DNA was trekked in, it would have been everywhere.  From your own words, this was the only place.

[Chapter 27, Page 342]  One morning, Manuela Comodi, the co-prosecutor, told the court that to show her dedication to the case, she had brought in her own bra.  She was carrying a white cotton underwire bra, the closest match in her drawer to what Meredith had been wearing, although, she said, chuckling, it was larger than Meredith’s. Comodi hung the bra on a hanger to mimic a person wearing it. Using her index finger, she showed the mesmerized court how Raffaele could have hooked his finger to pull the back strap of Meredith’s bra (somehow leaving DNA on the clasp but not the cloth) and then sliced off the fastener section with a knife.

  • Prosecutors trying to explain how DNA is present?  Go figure.

  • Well, to cut someone’s clothing off, holding it at some point seems reasonable.

[Chapter 27, Page 343]  Another day, the prosecution said that finding my DNA in the bathroom was proof I’d been involved in the murder. They didn’t consider that I had lived in the villa and used that bathroom every day for weeks. Even rookie forensic scientists know that roommates leave DNA in bathrooms, but the prosecution insisted it was incriminating evidence. They claimed that the only way my DNA could have been collected with the samples of Meredith’s blood was if I’d been washing her blood off my hands.

  • While DNA in your own bathroom is very common, mixed blood is not.  You omit that detail.

  • You also leave out that you had said before that the blood was not there the day earlier.

[Chapter 27, Page 343]  The prosecution said they were certain the murder had been a group attack. Why, then, was none of my DNA or Raffaele’s DNA in Meredith’s bedroom? Their answer: because Raffaele and I had scrubbed the crime scene clean of our DNA, leaving only Guede’s.  That theory gave me super powers. DNA is not something you can cherry-pick; it’s invisible. Even if I could somehow magically see DNA, there is no way I could tell one person’s DNA from another’s just by looking—no one can.

  • You’re right, you can’t always see DNA.  That is how your blood was left (mixed with Meredith’s) in 5 places

  • And footprints, even if invisible to the naked eye, can be raised—via luminol

  • DNA is just one type of evidence to consider.  The real world is not a C.S.I. episode.

[Chapter 27, Page 344]  The prosecution contended that, as representatives of the state, they were the impartial party and maintained that their conclusions were legitimate. Our experts, they said, couldn’t be trusted because they were being paid to defend us. And our critiques, objections, and conclusions were just smoke screens created to confuse the judges and jury.

  • Your experts are just trying to throw up smoke screens.  Screaming ‘‘contamination’‘, and ‘‘too small to test’’ without some basis is just creating noise.

[Chapter 27, Page 344]  It distressed me that Meredith’s family thought I was guilty, but I always had huge empathy for them.

  • It distressed you enough to write this nasty book?  To include details of Meredith’s sex life?

  • The woman you only knew for a month must have suffered, since she had her fucking throat cut?  Well, shit happens, but you need to move on with your life.

[Chapter 27, Page 345]  But I was still so blinded by hope, and my faith in my own innocence, that I actually read this news as positive. I could be accused, but they couldn’t possibly convict me of something I hadn’t done. There was only one honest outcome. I couldn’t imagine that the jurors would side with the police without question. They couldn’t ignore everything that our defense had put forth. “They must think we don’t need the review because there’s already enough reasonable doubt,” I said to Luciano.

  • They didn’t convict you for something you didn’t do.  They convicted you for murdering Meredith and framing Patrick—things you actually did.

  • Again, you need some basis to make these claims.  Merely objecting without offering something isn’t helpful.

[Chapter 27, Page 347]  In the weeks leading up to the closing arguments, I put our chances of winning at 95 percent.  Carlo gave us fifty-fifty. “Judge Massei challenges the defense a lot more than he does the prosecution,” he said. “And the judges and jury nod whenever the prosecution or the Kerchers’ lawyer talks, but look bored when it’s our turn.” Still, I held tight to optimism. Not without reason. Journalists told Mom and Dad they weren’t convinced by the prosecution’s arguments. Even the Italian media, uniformly negative since the beginning, seemed to be turning around. A show I saw on the second anniversary of Meredith’s death replayed Rudy Guede’s first recorded conversation, in which he said that I wasn’t at the villa. If the press can see the truth, surely the judge and jury can, too.

  • You put your chances at 95%?  Any reason, or just a number you made up?

  • The Italian media was with you?  Maybe the misinformed American media.

  • Yes, Guede’s conversations are so reliable.  Did they play the ones where he accused you and Sollecito of the murder?

[Chapter 27, Page 347]  A public opinion poll on TV said that more than 60 percent of Italians thought I was guilty. The people who only watched television reports most likely sided with the prosecution. That realization spawned a deep-down fear that I’d be convicted, my innocence be damned. Prisoners gossiped about my case all the time, behind my back and to me. “Come on, Amanda. You can tell me.”

  • This is confusing.  You said that the media was now with you a few pages back, yet you claim that people who only watch television reports most likely sided with the prosecution

  • The media is with you, but they report negative things?

  • And if the people watching at home think your’re guilty, (which is about 60%), does that mean the other 40% of Italy attended the trial?


[Chapter 28, Page 350]  One day I got up the courage to ask Chris, who was in Perugia leading up to the closing argumentsand verdict, “What would a conviction mean?” So afraid to acknowledge that uncharted, dark place, I could only whisper. “There would be an appeal, and if you didn’t get acquitted, then the Supreme Court would exonerate you. At the most, Amanda, it would take five years,” Chris explained. “Five years?!” That was way more than I wanted to know. Chris jumped in to reassure me. “If that happened, Amanda, we’d find a way to save you! But don’t worry! It’s not going to happen! And if for some utterly bizarre reason it goes the wrong way, I’m moving to Italy.”

  • Well, finally some truth.  Convicted defendants get an automatic appeal, then a Cassation (Supreme Court) hearing.  2 automatic appeals.

  • A huge cry from the ‘‘put on trial again and again’’ that we keep hearing about.

[Chapter 28, Page 351]  Prosecutor Giuliano Mignini gave his closing argument first. Alternating between a calm, almost quiet recitation of the “facts” and the fiery rants of a preacher at a tent revival, Mignini summarized Raffaele’s and my part in the savagery that took Meredith’s life. He started with the idea that Filomena’s window was too high to be a credible entry point into the villa and ended with our tossing Meredith’s stolen British and Italian cell phones over the garden wall.  Raffaele and I had accused “this poor Rudy,” as Mignini called him, of “being the only one” to attack Meredith. “He has his own grave responsibility, but the responsibility is not only his own,”  Mignini intoned.

  • Wow, you call his closing the ‘‘rants of a preacher at a tent revival’‘.

  • Not only was Filomena’s room too high, there was nothing to grab onto, and it was the most visible point of entry.  Lousy place to break into.

  • Tossing the phones was seen as a way to divert attention, though it ultimately backfired.

  • Knox and Sollecito did try to pin it all on Guede as the ‘‘lone wolf’‘.

[Chapter 28, Page 351]  I couldn’t believe what the prosecutor was saying. He, who was championing himself as the bearer of truth for Meredith’s family, was calling the murderer “Poor Rudy”? Evidence of Rudy’s crimes was everywhere, and his history of theft matched the burglary. Poor Rudy? Guede had stolen! He had killed Meredith! He had left a handprint in Meredith’s blood! He had fled! He had lied! Poor Rudy?

  • Interesting how you knew about Guede’s prior break in.  It’s almost as if you knew him.

  • And what of Guede’s ‘‘staged burglary’’ on his roommates as an April Fool’s Day prank?  Oh, that was you.

  • Yes, we know he left the handprint.  You were careful not to remove it.

  • Guede fled to Germany.  According to your November 4, 2007 email, you wanted to flee Italy, but weren’t allowed to.

  • Guede has lied.  However, he never claimed to be in the kitchen with his hands over his ears, vaguely remembering Patrick killing Meredith.

[Chapter 28, Page 351]  “By now it was an unstoppable game of violence and sex. The aggressors initially threatened her and demanded her submission to the hard-core sex game. It’s easy to imagine Amanda, angry at the British girl for her increasing criticism of Amanda’s sexual easiness, reproaching Mez for her reserve. Let’s try to imagine—she insulted her. Perhaps she said, ‘You were a little saint. Now we’ll show you. Now you have no choice but to have sex.”’  He’s perverse! How did he come up with such a twisted scenario? He’s portraying me as a psychopath! Is Mignini allowed to put words in my mouth, thoughts in my head? I would never force anyone to have sex. I would never threaten or ridicule anyone.

  • You say you want Meredith’s family to read your book, and you include this?

  • How perverse to stage a burglary as a joke, or to throw rocks at cars.

  • You wouldn’t force anyone to have sex, you just write rape stories (like Baby Brother)

  • You are ridiculing just about everyone in this book.

[Chapter 28, Page 354] Then he recalled from earlier in the trial, when Judge Massei questioned me about my interrogation. “Your Honor asked, ‘But a suggestion in what sense? Did they tell you, ‘Say that it was Lumumba?’ Because a suggestion is just that ... And Amanda said, ‘No. They didn’t tell me that it was him.’ And so what suggestion is it? “Amanda said, ‘But they told me, Ah, but we know that you were with him, that you met with him.’ The police were doing their job ... they were trying to make this person talk ... These are the pressures, then. Completely normal and necessary investigative activity. There were no suggestions because a suggestion is: Say it was Lumumba.” Mignini knew how my interrogation had gone. The police were yelling that I knew who the murderer was, that I had to remember, that I’d gone out to meet Patrick that night. They made me believe I had trauma-induced amnesia. They threatened me if I didn’t name the murderer—even though I said I didn’t know who the murderer was! How is that not suggestion? How is that not coercion?

  • Where to begin with this?

  • There were no pressures.  You went the police station uninvited when Sollecito was called in.

  • You were told to go home but refused.  You agreed to draw up a list of potential contacts.

  • The only pressure came when Sollecito pulled your alibi

  • You were not yelled at.

  • You were not threatened.

  • You were not hit either.  Oh, you forgot to include that.

  • It is not coercion because none of the above happened.

[Chapter 28, Page 354]  Mignini’s rant lasted one day, from 9 A.M. to 4 P.M.

  • Show the ‘‘Mayor’’ some respect, you stupid liar…

[Chapter 28, Page 354]  “I’d like to show the court a visual prop we’ve constructed to demonstrate our theory of the murder,” Comodi said. This introduced the most surreal moment of my nightmarish trial: a 3-D computer-generated animation with avatars representing me, Raffaele, Rudy Guede, and Meredith.  Carlo and Luciano were apoplectic. They shouted their objections, insisting that the film was unnecessary and inflammatory. Judge Massei allowed it. I didn’t watch it, but my lawyers said the avatar of me was dressed in a striped shirt like one I often wore to court. Raffaele, Guede, and I were depicted sneering.  Meredith’s avatar had an expression of horror and pain. The cartoon used real crime scene photos to show the blood splatters in Meredith’s room.

  • Trying to use a video simulation to explain a crime?  Happens regularly in U.S. courts.

  • So, should Meredith be sneering, and Knox, Sollecito, Guede have horrified expressions?




  • Comments

    Posts should speed up again in the next few days, with the conclusion of Machiavelli’s translation series, the conclusion of Catnip’s critique series, and a lengthy examination of the Marasca/Bruno report by the lawyer James Raper who has done cool, precise analysis repeatedly in the past. 

    We pass on what is tactically smart from Italy, although this sure is a cat and mouse game. Some moves we get to hear about we are asked to keep quiet on for now, partly as it’s proved to be a bad idea to forewarn the PR and partly as incriminating things need to remain up on the web. The chutzpah of RS and AK have been real boons.

    Judges Marasca and Bruno are clearly not in a comfortable position now, even though there was a huge move on their part between their hastily explained verdict late March and when their full report came out in September - they had moved from 180 degrees away from guilt to about 1 degree away from guilt in less than six months. In the interim in Italy, among other ridicule, this huge shot across their bows came out.

    http://truejustice.org/ee/index.php?/tjmk/comments/legal_reading_suggesting_fifth_chambers_encroached_on_first_chamber/

    That incredibly smart move really did prick their balloon. Neither the March nor September Marasca/Bruno position was what Bongiorno in her corrupting moves had intended to achieve, but RS and AK both jumped the gun and made claims of a verdict of full innocence and zero evidence - and then the final report whisked the rug out from under their feet.

    Legally they are in very weak positions, weaker (because of their books and other claims, and because of Italian and UK law)  than OJ Simpson’s ever was - and he ended up faced damages of $30-plus million and years being tormented by a tough crowd in his north Nevada jail.

    Posted by Peter Quennell on 10/25/15 at 11:45 AM | #

    This key series has strategic intent. The longer it gets, the stronger, so apologies to readers but to Chimera immense thanks.

    The RS book was similarly done in 2013, and we posted a lot of whacks at it. In a few days a similar numbered dissection will have its own page.

    The Knox and RS books of course were beamed only at English speakers and kept below the radar in Italy. Both were group efforts written in English on the US West Coast.

    Neither shadow writer and neither publisher did any due diligence in Perugia - even the defense lawyers were blindsided when the books came out.

    Papa Doc on national TV renounced a key RS claim (actually a felony defamation to make it) in which RS claimed Mignini was desperate for a deal and wanted him to roll over on Knox (to which he said he angrily refused, hence the title “Honor Bound”).

    Now that the books are both fully in Italian at last, a fuse has been lit. RS is back in the Florence court (courtesy the Porta a Porta crime show on which an Italian reporter in New York read damning excerpts to much of Italy) but he and Gumbel have come up with no defense, and Bongiorno has walked away.

    Knox is not yet in court, but excerpts from this book Chimera dismembers published in Oggi have resulted in Oggi being hauled to court. The case will peak early next year.That is the thin edge of the wedge to a lot of defamation charges against Knox from numerous complainants also expected next year.

    Chimera is nearly done with the Knox book, and then we will finally have a master list of false claims with a known total. Even Chimera was surprised when I counted the number of false claims (410) so far, with final total close to 600.

    Knox sure makes things up.

    Posted by Peter Quennell on 10/25/15 at 11:46 AM | #

    Thank you, Peter.

    Thank you, Chimera. You’ve done a lot of work and you’ve done it diligently.

    You wrote, “My opinion is that this book is essentially Amanda Knox’s way of getting back at everyone in Italy she ever encountered, while falsely making her notoriously brash, sharp-elbowed, frequently drugged-up persona look endearing, naive, and squeaky-clean.”

    I agree with you.

    Knox is not only a liar; she is a deceiver. I’ve observed her endless pattern of first telling a lie or several lies and then giving a false narrative of reality with which to displace a realistic interpretation of the subject matter.

    She and the people helping her with PR practically tell people what to think, which is, of course, problematic, given her interest in deception. I find it insulting, but I guess there are people who will believe anything they’re told.

    I thoughtful it was very interesting that you caught her telling the truth (for once). The conversation she relates having with Chris in which she asked about how the legal process works, and he told her, ring true.

    Unfortunately for Knox, it also serves to prove she knew the entire time there was never a “re-trial,” something about which she lied relentlesly.

    I guess hers is a classic case of everyone’s wrong but her, her family, the people her family paid, and the typical small band of groupies such people attract.

    Posted by JohnQ on 10/25/15 at 04:51 PM | #

    It reminds me of the anecdote about the proud mother watching her son at a parade: “He’s the only one marching in step!”

    Chimera, phenomenal work!

    Three observations about AK’s lies.

    1. The scream.  Why is it so important for AK to place the scream as far away from Mrs Capezzalli as possible?  You weren’t there, AK, so why should you care whether Mrs C. heard a scream or not?  I get it.  Your defense knows you were there, so they are trying to contrive a time of death that rules AK out.

    2. The police stopped the coroner taking a body temperature for hours.  This has to be the height of cheek, when AK never rang the police once.  Anyway, a coroner is a judge quite independent of the pathologist.  As the body was not found until up to 16 hours after death, it’s collossal chutzpah by AK to sneer at the police about that.

    3. AK informs the reader she can’t have done it as the computer shows Amelie didn’t end until 2115.  She tells us the police must be idiots not to realise this.  And the a Naruto cartoon downloaded for twenty minutes.  It was deemed an autodownload by IT experts.  Anyway, how does that exempt AK from leaving the house ahead of RS?  Any clever IT boff will know how to set a computer to provide you an alibi via apparent activity.  McAffee autodownloads, for example.

    Of course, criminals will lie about their crimes, so no surprise there, then, to find AK and RS lying like there’s no tomorrow.

    Reminds me of a Sex Pistols track: “You’re a liar, liar, liar, You’re a liar, liar, liar…”

    Posted by Slow Jane on 10/25/15 at 07:23 PM | #

    Chimera,

    Rather you than me, (but well done for reading through it).

    What a despicable book: “the tight timing gave us an alibi”; “I was sure there was no way the jury would put their faith in someone who said she didn’t remember”...  [God give me strength]; “either he (Lumumba) felt he had to be honest”...;  “I was terrified that my inattention would be interpreted as not caring.”

    Surely an innocent person would be emphasising their innocence?

    And she never says anything like “blimey, I lived next to Meredith and now her parents are being told I did it??  How could I tell them that I wasn’t involved”...

    Damn this neverending saga.

    Posted by DavidB on 10/25/15 at 07:25 PM | #

    Thanks for the feedback guys.

    Thanks Pete, for formatting these posts.  Must have been tedious.

    Much thanks to AK herself for re-releasing the book in June 2015.  Starts the statute of limitations all over again.

    I’m still surprised at how much lie-correcting was sent off to Peter.  I gave a pass to many questionable topics (and bypassed the ‘‘Interrogation Hoax’‘, and her ‘‘statements’‘). But it is still into the 100’s, or the 1000’s, if you want to break each ‘‘bundle’’ into separate lies.

    JohnQ - You are right.  Knox does admit that Italy has the ‘‘3-stage-process’‘: trial, appeal, Cassation hearing.  She also admits that this process frequently leads to long legal twists and turns.  And yes, it does prove she knowingly lied about her legal status.  Further, Knox admits that in 2008, Guede took the short-form-trial for the 1/3 deductions.  However, Knox blames Dalla Vedova and Ghirga for not telling her it was an option before then.

    Slow Jane - Correct, Knox is stretching the T.O.D., trying to give herself something of an alibi.  Even if you took Knox’s timeline as ‘‘gospel’’ it still doesn’t give her an alibi, as she and Sollecito lived minutes away and there is nearly an hour unaccounted for.

    Knox also doesn’t address the fact that Sollecito has repeatedly said she wasn’t with him that night, that she went out alone.

    An open question to all American readers: does anyone live in the Chicago area and may be able to cover AK’s appearance in early December at that law school?  Some feedback would be nice.

    Posted by Chimera on 10/25/15 at 10:57 PM | #

    Marvellous work yet again Chimera. Cup of tea, a biscuit and a lie down in a darkened room required methinks.

    It is crystal clear that Knox has a visceral hatred of Meredith in the way that she writes about her. She never misses a chance to describe in excruciating detail, aspects of Meredith’s demise. She can’t even leave the poor girl in peace post mortem either, actually choosing to describe the slides containing pictures of Meredith’s dissected stomach, allegedly not looked at by our suddenly squeamish heroine. Truly hateful behaviour.

    There is no logical reason why such detail was necessary for this tawdry book. One is left feeling that the primary purpose is most likely for Knox to have a permanent written record of her handy work, in the absence of the actual pictures. She may have the pictures too, I’m not sure if she will have been allowed to keep copies. A bit like a killer going back to the scene of the crime, this appears to me to be Knox’s way of keeping the memory of when she felt most powerful fresh in her twisted mind. Plus she gets to torture her nemesis’s family. Another bonus for this most ill of people.

    I almost gagged at the total absence of self awareness Knox has when she describes Comodi’s court performance in relation to the knife…..“her theatrics were exasperating”. This is the same Knox who describes herself putting on crime scene bootees when she was taken back to the cottage and then proclaiming “tah dah”. Of course, we’re supposed to just understand that Knox is quirky. Not at all exasperating.

    As Master Yoda would say of Knox, “strong it is, the psychopathy in this one”.

    Posted by davidmulhern on 10/26/15 at 10:48 PM | #

    “Had Raffaele been in the room, his DNA would have been as abundant as Guede’s. It would be illogical to suggest that it was left on a single small hook on Meredith’s bra and nowhere else.”

    On the same note, had Raffaele been in his car, his DNA would be abundant also.

    “Another day, the prosecution said that finding my DNA in the bathroom was proof I’d been involved in the murder. They didn’t consider that I had lived in the villa and used that bathroom every day for weeks.”

    I would think that using the bathroom everyday also entailed using other rooms in the cottage, her bedroom for example, yet none of her own DNA was found.

    We also know she is lying about the “fried hard drives” she and her cult like to throw out there, often.

    “It distressed me that Meredith’s family thought I was guilty, but I always had huge empathy for them.”

    She has so much empath that she decided to allow posters on her own blog to attack Meredith’s family. One of the translators of the recent ISC motivations report, a Russian calling herself Alex K, can be seen all over her blog making such sick comments as calling Mr Kercher “a dirty old man”. It gets worse but I won’t repeat any.

    Not once has she instructed her gang of inbred fans from the website owned by Bruce Fischer of Chicago to back off harassing or abusing the Kercher family. This makes her complicit in my opinion.

    Posted by Sarah Phillips on 10/27/15 at 05:49 AM | #

    In chapter 26 Knox shows extreme irritability about the basketball court, saying it was tailor made for the prosecution’s purposes. It’s clear the basketball court, made famous in this case as Piazza Grimana, remains an intensely sore spot for Knox. She could never shake Toto’s sighting of her there with her boyfriend on night of the murder.

    Of lesser importance she still seems ticked that the boys downstairs didn’t welcome her as just one of the guys into their hoops game. Her Seattle tomboy thing didn’t play so well in Italy.

    We know Rudy loved basketball and was nicknamed The Baron after a basketball player. Rudy’s dream was to become an American basketball star, so he was probably at the Piazza shooting hoops quite often and got to know a lot of people there, including the cottage boys and Amanda. Perhaps she introduced herself to him as she sought to intrude on the guys from downstairs who might have included Rudy during their basketball games.

    A Knox invasion of the court would seem typical of Knox who was used to her soccer, rock-climbing, and generally competitive envy. Seems the boys rejected her efforts and it stung.

    A lot of things she now regrets probably happened at that basketball court, which is why it remains a sensitive point with Knox.

    This post is a great takedown, Chimera, of the facile lies and obvious poses in Knox’s self-serving book. Much food for thought. Thanks for your work invested in documenting Knox’s deviations from truth.

    Posted by Hopeful on 10/27/15 at 08:18 PM | #


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