2013-15 Knox Book Lies 223 To 275


Comments and corrections

#223 [Chapter 21, Page 244] ‘’ ... At twenty, I still had a childlike view of people. I looked for the saving graces in everyone. I thought people were naturally empathetic, that they felt ashamed and guilty when they mistreated someone else. That faith in humanity was being picked away, but I held to the belief that people were basically good. And that good people would believe me and set me free….’‘

  • You look for the saving graces in everyone, yet you assume everyone thinks you are a monster?

  • People are naturally empathetic .... so they DON’T tell someone that their friend had ‘‘their throat fucking slit’‘?

  • People are naturally empathetic .... so they DON’T say that ‘‘shit happens’’ regarding a murdered friend’?

  • People are naturally empathetic .... so they DON’T claim someone is a friend, then that you want to get on with your life?

  • Why would being good have anything to do as to whether you are believed or not?  Murder cases hinge on evidence, not feelings.


#224 [Chapter 21, Page 244] ‘’ ... Part of the growing up I did in prison was learning that people are complicated, and that some will do something wrong to achieve what they think is right. Since my second interrogation with Mignini, I knew the prosecution was intent on undermining my alibi. Over the coming weeks and months, I would learn just how far they would go to try to prove me guilty….’‘

  • Some will do something wrong to achieve what they think is right?  So, falsely accusing PL, because getting away was right?

  • Which alibi was Mignini intent on undermining? The one that Raffaele refused, the party that he made up, or the one that he was alone on his computer while you went out?  Or was it your alibi (statements), that you were a witness to PL killing Meredith?  Or the one where you and Raffy were at his apartment?

  • 2nd interrogation?  It was his first ‘‘interrogation’‘.  To recap:

  • Mignini was not present at your 1:45 statement.  Chapter 10 in your book is 100% fiction.

  • Mignini was present (he was called from home), at your 5:45 statement, but asked you no questions.

  • You seem to remember your number of interrogations the way you remember how many times you met Guede

  • How far Mignini would go?  You mean, present your lies, false statements, phone records, DNA evidence .... that is what prosecutors DO.  There are these things (both in Italy and in America), called TRIALS.  You will learn more.


#225 [Chapter 21, Page 245] ‘’ ... The prints couldn’t have been made by Raffaele’s newer Nike Air Force 1s, he said. “They had just seven concentric circles.” By show’s end he had removed the possibility that Raffaele had been at the murder scene and put another strike against Guede. Raffaele’s family must have felt euphoric….’‘

  • Well, the shoes might not implicate Raffy, but those bare feet, and that ‘‘hammer toe’’ will

  • Euphoric, at another strike against Guede?  Hmmm…. were you trying to frame him or something?


#226 [Chapter 21, Page 245] ‘’ ... I knew this “evidence” could hurt us. I also knew that Raffaele had as much chance of coming into contact with Meredith’s bra as Meredith had meeting up with a knife from Raffaele’s apartment. Neither could be true, but the prosecution would use both these findings to tie us to the crime….’‘

  • Well, this is true, but in a manipulative way.  Yes, Raffaele would have as much chance, namely both incidents would only happen, if Raffaele were involved in the killings.

  • Victim’s DNA on suspect’s knife, and suspect’s DNA on victim’s bra?  Why would the prosecution see that as evidence?

  • Yes, they do tie you to the crime.  No need to be sarcastic.

#227 [Chapter 21, Page 246] ‘’ ... I wasn’t implicated by the clasp, but I knew that the prosecution would never believe that Raffaele had acted without me. They’d say I gave him access to the villa. I was the reason he’d met Meredith. We were each other’s alibis. If they could show that Raffaele was directly connected to the crime, I would, at the very least, be charged as his accomplice…’‘

  • You are being disingenuous again.  While the DNA conclusively links Raffaele to the scene, you are implying that the police would leap to conclusions to connect you as well.

  • While you present these as fantasies, they are quite reasonable.  Raffaele’s connection to the house was you, his ‘‘girlfriend’‘.  You claimed you were with him, yes, you were each other’s alibis.  Yes, disproving the alibi of one would cast suspicion on the other.

#228 [Chapter 21, Page 248] ‘’ ... This new claim was another barricade separating me from my real life—one more accusation on a growing list. Too many impossible things were being served up as “truth”—Meredith’s DNA on Raffaele’s kitchen knife, Raffaele’s DNA on Meredith’s bra clasp, and now Meredith’s blood on the soles of my feet….’‘

  • Separating you from your real life?  What, you just want to get on with your life?

  • Did you see the crime scene photos?  There was a lot of blood in Meredith’s room.  Yes, you could have stepped in some.

#229 [Chapter 21, Page 248] ‘’ ... It was crazy enough to be told that “investigative instinct” had convinced the police I was involved in Meredith’s murder—that I was dangerous and evil. Now forensic science—the supposedly foolproof tests I was counting on to clear me—was turning up findings I knew were wrong. I, like most people who get their information from TV crime shows, was unaware that forensic evidence has to be interpreted, that human error and bias can, and do, upend results…’‘

  • It wasn’t investigative instinct.  It was those damn false accusation statements you insisted on writing.

  • Well, innocent people don’t write such things, and they tend to have just one (1) alibi.

  • The foolproof tests you were expecting to clear me ... and implicate Guede?

  • You are unhappy and surprised that TV and CSI lied to you?  Okay ....

  • Human error and bias can upend results.  So can falsely claiming to witness someone doing the crime.

#230 [Chapter 21, Page 249] ‘’ ... I always liked seeing my lawyers, but now I had to brace myself for each visit. I didn’t have to wait long before they brought more devastating news. Less than a week later, investigators reported that they’d found my DNA mixed with Meredith’s blood ringing the drain of the bidet in our shared bathroom. The implication was that I’d rinsed my hands and feet in the bidet after slashing her throat. They said that my skin cells had shown up—not Raffaele’s or Rudy Guede’s—because I was the last person to wash up in that bathroom…’‘

  • You are unhappy because the lawyers only bring bad news?

  • Mixed DNA in the bathroom?  What about the mixed DNA in Filomena’s room—you omit that.

  • You know, for all your TV interviews, you claim ‘‘no evidence’‘, but your own book lists quite a lot of it.

  • You were the last person to wash up there?  Finally, another truthful statement.

  • You sure didn’t ‘‘shower’’ in that blood soaked bathroom the morning after, did you?

#231 [Chapter 21, Page 250] ‘’ ... The pictures of the chemical-stained bathroom did what, I have to assume, the police wanted. The public reaction proved that a picture—especially a “bloody” picture from a crime scene—is worth a hundred thousand words. At least. I knew what people were thinking. Who but a knife-wielding killer would take a shower in a “blood-streaked” bathroom? Who but a liar would say there had been only a few flecks of blood? The answer? Foxy Knoxy….’‘

  • You are trying to be flippant and sarcastic here, but most people would draw the same conclusions.

#232 [Chapter 21, Page 250] ‘’ ... My lawyers complained to the judges that the prosecution was using the media to our disadvantage, but the judge said that whatever was reported in the press wouldn’t be held against us. The flow of information between the prosecution and the media was an accepted but unacknowledged fact….’‘

  • Using the media to your disadvantage?  Did the prosecution hire a PR firm or something?

  • The PR didn’t convict you, the evidence, which you have been listing so well in your book, does.

#233 [Chapter 21, Page 251] ‘’ ... The denial, fear, and bafflement I felt in the beginning of this nightmare had turned into quiet indignation and defiance. I finally accepted that I was my only friend inside Capanne. I clung to my dad at every visit. The rest of the time, I used the only coping tool I knew: I retreated into my own head….’‘

  • You are your only friend?  What about the bisexual Cera, or Lupa, who believes in you?

  • Retreating into your head is okay, just please don’t sign any more statements.

#234 [Chapter 21, Page 251] ‘’ ... Cera’s sense of control came from cleaning. When I moved in I liked that her cell was spotless. I didn’t understand that it was her obsession, until she demanded that I dry off the walls of the shower before I dried myself; place the shampoo and lotion bottles in a perfect line on the counter, equally spaced apart; tuck in my bedsheets with military precision; arrange the apples in the fruit bowl stem up; and avoid using the kitchen sink. I tried hard to get along with Cera. I helped her with her schoolwork and either cleaned alongside her or stayed out of the way. My job, after she was done mopping and drying the floor, was to take a panno spugna—a spongelike cloth—and clean the baseboards on my hands and knees. I complained bitterly to Mom about these things when she came to Italy over her spring break…’‘

  • Why include any of this?  It doesn’t help clear anything up.

  • You are falsely imprisoned, and you are complaining about having to clean?

#235 [Chapter 21, Page 252] ‘’ ... One morning, when I was walking into the bathroom to put something away, I bumped into Cera, and she kissed me on the lips. I just stood there staring at her, too surprised to know what to say. “Your face is telling me that was not okay,” she said quickly. “I’m really sorry.”  She never made physical advances after that, but she did once ask if I was curious what it was like to have sex with a woman, like her. My stock answer—an emphatic no —made her feel bad…’‘

  • So, you proudly announce (and publish) that you are a random slut, but being a lesbian puts you off?

  • Even if any of this is true, why include it?  Are you just trying to humiliate Cera, they way you publish personal details about Meredith?

#236 [Chapter 21, Page 253] ‘’ .... My only hope and constant thought during that winter and spring was that the judge might allow me to live with my family in an apartment, under house arrest. My first plea had been rejected, but my lawyers had another hearing scheduled for April 1. Even though Carlo and Luciano weren’t confident about the outcome, I was sure it would happen. I was counting the days….’‘

#237 [Chapter 21, Page 254] ‘’ ... Luciano and Carlo came to see me the next day. They reassured me that no one, not even the prosecution, believed Guede. “He ran away, he’s a liar, a thief, a rapist, a murderer,” Carlo said. “No one could ever consider him a reliable witness, because he has everything to gain from blaming you. The prosecution is making a big deal about it because it incriminates you.”  “Please, Amanda,” Luciano said. “This is not what you need to worry about. You need to stay strong.” Still, I couldn’t be consoled. With Guede’s testimony against me, there was absolutely no chance a judge would free me from prison….’‘

  • Knox is distorting things once again.  Yes, accomplices turning on each other is powerful, but prosecutors usually suspect that the one is minimizing his own involvement for a reduced sentence.

  • And it is not Guede that got house arrest denied.  There was PLENTY of other evidence.

  • There was also those psychiatric evaluations, which were a large factor, yet you don’t publish them

  • http://www.truejustice.org/ee/index.php?/tjmk/comments/the_knox_interrogation_hoax_17

#238 [Chapter 21, Page 254] ‘’ ... In early April, Carlo came to Capanne. His face gave away his worry. “Amanda,” he said, “the prosecution now says there’s evidence of a cleanup. They contend that’s why there’s no evidence that you and Raffaele were in Meredith’s bedroom—that you scrubbed the crime scene of your traces.”

  • No evidence of you in Meredith’s room?  What about that size 37 shoeprint, which was NOT Meredith’s?  Or Raffy’s DNA (which you describe), or the bra clasp?

  • This is a twist of what the prosecutors believe.  They thought you tried to selectively clean up, but that there was still evidence there.

#239 [Chapter 21, Page 254] ‘’ ... “Amanda, the investigators are in a conundrum,” Carlo said. “They found so much of Guede’s DNA in Meredith’s room and on and inside her body. But the only forensic evidence they have of you is outside her bedroom. Raffaele’s DNA evidence is only on the bra hook. If you and Raffaele participated in the murder, as the prosecution believes, your DNA should be as easy to find as Guede’s.” “But Carlo, no evidence doesn’t mean we cleaned up. It means we weren’t there!” “I know,” Carlo said, sighing. “But they’ve already decided that you and Raffaele faked a break-in to nail Guede. I know it doesn’t make sense. They’re just adding another link to the story. It’s the only way the prosecution can involve you and Raffaele when the evidence points to a break-in and murder by Guede.”

  • This is once again twisting things.  Five (5) spots of mixed DNA Amanda/Meredith were found, including in Filomena’s room. Guede’s DNA was NEVER found in Filomena’s room, even though it is where he ‘‘supposedly’’ broke in.

  • Just because these 5 mixed spots were not in the bedroom, does not mean they must be ruled out.

  • And what about your shoeprint in Meredith’s room?  Wait, that is not on Meredith’s body.

  • Sollecito’s bloody footprint on the bathroom mat, should that be excluded simply because it was not in the ‘‘murder room’‘?

  • Should that bathroom in general be excluded, simply because Meredith was not killed in the bedroom?

  • Should Filomena’s bedroom be excluded, despite the (alleged) burglary point of entry, simply because Meredith wasn’t killed there?

  • Should the other bathroom, where Guede left his poop be excluded, since Meredith was not killed there?  Wait, that is evidence against Guede ....

  • Should the hallway, where the luminol revealed bloody footprints be excluded, just because Meredith was not killed in the hall?

  • Should Sollecito’s kitchen, where the murder weapon was found, be excluded, simply because Meredith was not killed there?

  • So, there may be no evidence here… but only if you redefine what the crime scene is.

#240 [Chapter 21, Page 255] ‘’ ... Judge Matteini sent me her decision about house arrest on May 16: “Denied.” By then the prosecution had stacked so much against me that Guede’s testimony hadn’t even figured in her decision. Even though I hadn’t left the country before my arrest, the judge was certain that Mom would have helped me leave when she was to have arrived in Perugia on November 6. That, she said, is why the police planned to arrest me before Mom could get to me. It turned out that they’d gotten her itinerary the same time I did—by bugging my phone….’‘

  • Judge Matteini send the decision about house arrest on May 16th?  That long?  Matteini is the Judge who you saw back in November 2007, and it was the Ricciarelli court in Noivember 2007 and the Italian Supreme Court (Cassation) in April 2008 who heard the appeal and denied house arrest.  You are mixing these up, either accidently, or on purpose.

  • The police planned to arrest you?  Okay, so when they called Raffaele about his alibi, they knew you would show up?  They knew you would beg to be let in (after they told you to go home)?  They knew you would bring your homework, and start doing guymnastics?  They knew that after some questioning, your mind would suddenly imagine an innocent man committing the crime?  They knew you had such communication problems, that your statements would only get more confusing?  Wow, these cops are diabolical.

  • If they knew your Mother was coming, wouldn’t they have ‘‘set the trap’’ sooner, to make sure you were locked up in case Mom came early?

#241 [Chapter 21, Page 256] ‘’ ... This new setback conjured up all the desperation, the nauseating helplessness, I’d felt that morning. I could hardly breathe thinking about it. I remembered how relieved I’d been that my mom was flying over, how much I needed her. As soon as she said she was coming to Italy, I realized I’d been stubbornly, stupidly insistent that I could help the police find Meredith’s killer on my own.  I’d been tricked…’

  • You could help the police find Meredith’s killer?  Well, you did, you just layered it in total B.S.

  • After days of claiming to know nothing, you had a vision, or conniption, that you witnessed someone else do it.

  • In your later statement, you said that Raffaele ‘‘might’’ be there.

  • In the statement after that, you say you don’t know what is true, and you made things up

  • You helped, in that you left some of Rudy’s forensic traces behind.

  • You’d been tricked?  You mean CSI and TV lied to you?

#242 [Chapter 21, Page 256] ‘’ ... Cera started trying to prepare me for the chance of another fifteen years in prison. “I think you should say you’re guilty,” she advised me one day, “because it will take years off your sentence.” “I will not lie!” I yelled, spitting out one word at a time. “I’m not scared of Guede or the prosecutor! I’m ready to fight! I don’t know anything about this murder, and I will go free!”

  • You will not lie?  Wow, that is a first.

  • You’re not scared of Guede?  More likely he is scared of you.

  • You’re not scared of the prosecutor?  You found out he’s not the Mayor?

  • You don’t know anything about the murder?  Ummm…. those statements you signed….

#243 [Chapter 22, Page 261] ‘’ ... Oh my God. I’ve been formally charged with murder. I wanted to scream, “This is not who I am! You’ve made a huge mistake! You’ve got me all wrong!”  I was now fluent enough in Italian to see how ludicrous the charges were. Along with murder, I was charged with illegally carrying around Raffaele’s kitchen knife. It was galling. Real crimes had been committed against Meredith; the police owed her a real investigation. Instead, they were spinning stories to avoid admitting they’d arrested the wrong people…’‘

  • Not who you are?  That is irrelevant, it is what you did on one day.  Why do you seem so concerned with how you appear?

  • No, I think they have it pretty right.

  • Police did owe Meredith an investigation, and it overwhelmingly concluded that you, Sollecito, and Guede were involved.

  • They arrested the wrong people?  Well, Lumumba was innocent, but who was it who got him locked up?

#244 [Chapter 22, Page 262] ‘’ ... Finally we could combat all the misinformation leaked to the media. We could explain that the knife had never left the kitchen, the striped sweater had never gone missing, the receipts weren’t for bleach, the underwear I bought wasn’t sexy. We could describe how the prosecution had come up with the bloody footprints. We’d explain why Meredith’s blood had mixed with my DNA in our shared bathroom, how my blood got on the faucet, and correct the notion that the crime was a sex game gone wrong. We could object to the prosecutor painting me as a whore and a murderer. My lawyers would finally get to see the prosecution’s documents. No more surprises….’‘

  • Yes, you could combat the misinformation leaked to the media.  You still have Marriott’s number?

  • You could ‘‘explain’’ the knife never left the kitchen, but you aren’t actually saying here that it never did.

  • You could ‘‘describe’’ how the prosecution came up with the bloody footprints?

  • You would ‘‘explain’’ Meredith’s blood mixed with your DNA, how your blood got on the faucet?

  • The prosecution never claimed it was a sex game gone wrong.  It was a ‘‘misinformation leaked’’ by your own people

  • Objecting to the prosecutor calling you a whore might be difficult, as he never did that.

  • Objecting to the prosecutor calling you a murderer… well, that is what trials are for.

  • Your lawyers would get to see the prosecution’s documents.  It is called ‘‘discovery’’ and is standard in Western courts.

  • For all your ‘‘no evidence’’ claims, you oddly seem to be listing a lot of evidence here.  I am confused.

#245 [Chapter 22, Page 263] ‘’ ... “We’re taking you off your restricted status.” Just like that. While I was being investigated, I was under judge’s orders to be kept separate for my own safety. But now, as an accused criminal, I passed from the judge’s responsibility to the prison’s…’‘

  • Like much of the book, this makes little sense.

  • If you were being kept separate, it would be for your protection, or because you were deemed to be a threat to other inmates.  The state of your investigation would be irrelevant.

  • Once you entered Capanne, you were the responsibility of the prison.  The judge is responsible for reviewing the legal case, but the prison monitors your welfare.  Are you being deliberately deceptive?  (And am I being rhetorical)?

#246 [Chapter 22, Page 263] ‘’ ... Prison officials had always claimed I was kept separate—I had cellmates but, with the exception of a few prescribed events, couldn’t interact with the broad population —because other inmates would probably beat me. Now, with only the mildest caution —“Be careful of the other girls!”—Argirò opened a second door. Instead of having passeggio by myself, I was in the company of fifteen sweaty women.

  • As soon as I walked outside, the gaggle of prisoners started hooting and hollering, “She’s out! She’s with us! Way to go!”

  • You were in danger of being beaten up?  Did you report this when you had representatives from the state department visiting?

  • Really?  You got a cheering for being out with other women?  Ego tripping here?

#247 [Chapter 22, Page 265] ‘’ ... Wilma’s behavior wasn’t that different from that of other prisoners—most were manipulative and liked to stir up drama—but she wasn’t smart enough to recognize this and to fake loyalty to the other women. People were able to see through her actions….’‘

  • Most are manipulative and like to stir up drama? It’s a shame you didn’t fit in better here.

  • People can see through her actions?  Too bad you didn’t realize that people can see through yours.

#248 [Chapter 22, Page 266] ‘’ ... As soon as I read the letter, I realized it was real. I was shocked that he was writing me. I’d felt betrayed by the months of silence and by his comments in the press distancing himself from me. And of course there was the issue of his previous claim that I had left his apartment the night of the murder and asked him to lie for me. He wrote that he’d been aching to contact me, and that it was his lawyers and family who hadn’t permitted him to get in touch. He said everyone had been afraid when we were first arrested, but that now he realized it had been a mistake to abandon me and wrong to submit to police pressure and acquiesce to their theory. “I’m sorry,” he said. “I still care about you. I still think about you all the time.”

  • You feel betrayed by Raffaele’s ‘‘distancing’’ comments?  But isn’t he serving time rather than throw you under the bus?  Hell that was the whole premise of ‘‘Honor Bound’‘.  Wait, it was all a crock.

  • So, you acknowledge Raffaele ‘‘did’’ say you asked him to lie. So you are admitting evidence of a false alibi exists?

  • He realizes ‘‘now’’ that abandoning you was a mistake?

  • He submitted to police pressures? You told Oggi that you broke up with Sollecito after he withdrew your alibi, yet considering you were ‘‘pressured’’ as well, you think you would be a bit more understanding.  Wait, the ‘‘pressures’’ never happened.

  • Raffaele is in this mess largely due to Amanda.  He likely DOES think about her a lot.

#249 [Chapter 22, Page 266] ‘’ ... I felt completely reassured by his letter. It wasn’t lovey-dovey, and that suited me fine. I no longer thought of us as a couple. Now we were linked by our innocence. It was a relief to know we were in this fight together. It was only much later that I learned how his interrogation had been as devastating as mine. I wrote him back the next morning. I was explicit about not wanting a romantic relationship anymore but added that I wanted the best for him and hoped he was okay. I knew I shouldn’t write about the case, so I only said I was optimistic that our lawyers would prove the prosecution wrong….’‘

  • You are fine with not seeing Raffaele and yourself as a couple?  Guess you moved on with your life.

  • You were linked by your innocence, or in the hollow claims of your ‘‘innocence’‘?

  • If you wanted the best for Raffy BEFORE Meredith’s death, you would not have involved him in your scheme.

  • If you wanted the best for Raffy AFTER Meredith’s death, you wouldn’t have dragged this court case for 7+ years.

  • You were in the fight together?  Good to know Raffaele would corroborate your alibi at trial, and wouldn’t ask to sever the Florence appeals, or say on American TV that he has questions about your behaviour, or hold a press conference to denounce you, or go on Porta a Porta to denounce you….

#250 [Chapter 22, Page 269] ‘’ ... All this happened while Luciano and Carlo were preparing the defense for my pretrial. They didn’t have everything they needed to break down the case completely —Meredith’s DNA on the knife and my “bloody” footprints were going unanswered. Two days before the pretrial started, we got news that was both heartening and unnerving. Police investigators revealed that they’d found an imprint of the murder weapon in blood on Meredith’s bedsheets, making it clear the weapon wasn’t in fact the knife with the six-and-a-half-inch blade the prosecution was claiming. The imprint was too short to have been made by Raffaele’s kitchen knife….’‘

  • You are omitting a lot here.  Forensic evidence is not the only thing the defence needs to ‘‘break down’‘.  There is also those false accusation statements you insisted on writing, your false alibis, you and Raffaele turning off your phones, the details you knew (such as Meredith screaming and having her throat cut).  These things have not been successfully challenged EVER.

  • Actually, the knife imprint WAS quite clear, so the police knew exactly what kind of knife they were looking for.

  • And the impression doesn’t have to be for the ENTIRE knife, if it is fairly distinctive.

#251 [Chapter 22, Page 269] ‘’ ... I reminded myself that we also had common sense on our side. There was no motive. I had no history of violence. I’d barely met Rudy Guede. Raffaele had not met him at all…’‘

  • Common sense is telling me that it is odd, you keep saying you had no history of violence, rather than just saying you didn’t do it.

  • You had barely met Guede ... but the details on that are very ... flexible.

  • Raffaele and Guede lived 100m apart, yet never met.

  • Speaking of motive: Raffaele is your ‘‘boyfriend’‘, and from this book, Guede has the hots for you.  Coincidence?

  • Speaking of motive: While it is useful to be able to explain a crime, motive is not required to prove in any country.

#252 [Chapter 22, Page 270] ‘’ ... Carlo, the pessimist, said, “Don’t get your hopes up, Amanda. I’m not sure we’ll win. There’s been too much attention on your case, too much pressure on the Italian legal system to think that you won’t be sent to trial.”

  • So, your lawyer is telling you that the justice system is being leaned on to prosecute you?  If someone called Carlo Dalla Vedova, would he confirm this?

#253 [Chapter 23, Page 272] ‘’ ... “You’re going to be a good girl so we don’t have to handcuff you, right?” another guard said. I had always been so polite and docile that a guard had once said to me, “If all the inmates were like you, we wouldn’t need prisons.”

  • True, Knox and Sollecito were not handcuffed going into court, but there is speculation this was a visual in order to seem ‘‘less harsh’‘

  • This seems a bit illogical, if all inmates were like you, we wouldn’t need prisons?  Yet you need to go to prison to be an inmate.

  • Yes, Knox was polite.  The guards also called her controlled and manipulative.

#254 [Chapter 23, Page 273] ‘’ ... My first thought wasn’t They think I’m a murderer. It was Meredith’s parents? I finally get to meet them…’‘

  • Well you are charged with their daughter/sister’s killing. They probably do think you are a murderer.

  • You finally get to meet them?  Surely, they would delighted to get to know you.

#255 [Chapter 23, Page 273] ‘’ ... I was devastated. I’d anticipated meeting them for a long time. I’d written and rewritten a sympathy letter in my head but had never managed to put it on paper. Now I felt stupid. How had I not anticipated their reaction? Why are you so surprised? What do you think this has been about all along? My grief for Meredith and my sadness for her family had kept me from thinking further. Of course they hate you, Amanda.  They believe you’re guilty. Everyone has been telling them that for months….’‘

  • You anticipated meeting them for a long time?  Killing Meredith is an odd way to expand your circle of friends.

  • A sympathy letter?  Saying sorry for your loss?

  • Your grief for Meredith?  Didn’t you say at trial that you only knew her for a month, and you were trying to move on with your life?

  • They hate you?  Well, they might hate you less if you told the truth about what happened, and showed actual remorse.

#256 [Chapter 23, Page 273] ‘’ ... The first day of the pretrial was mostly procedural. Almost immediately Guede’s lawyers requested an abbreviated trial. I had no idea the Italian justice system offered this option. Carlo later told me that it saves the government money. With an abbreviated trial, the judge’s decision is based solely on evidence; no witnesses are called. The defendant benefits from this fast-track process because, if found guilty, he has his sentence cut by a third…’‘

  • Guede requested the abbreviated trial because he feared you and Sollecito would pin it all on him, yet you omit that part.

  • Of course witnesses are called.  Who do you think has to testify about the evidence?  However, all least some facts have to be agreed upon to go short-form.

  • If he is guilty, his sentence is cut by 1/3. Absolutely right.  THAT is why Guede got those deductions, not from any deal, or testifying against you.

  • Out of curiosity, why didn’t you or Raffaele opt for the short form trial?

#257 [Chapter 23, Page 274] ‘’ ... Guede’s lawyers must have realized that he was better off in a separate trial, since the prosecution was intent on pinning the murder on us. The evidence gathered during the investigation pointed toward his guilt. His DNA was all over Meredith’s room and her body, on her intimate clothing and her purse. He had left his handprint in her blood on her pillowcase. He had fled the country. The prosecution called Guede’s story of how he “happened” to be at the villa and yet had not participated in the murder “absurd”—though they readily believed his claims against Raffaele and me. One of the big hopes for us was that with so much evidence against Guede, the prosecution would have to realize Raffaele and I hadn’t been involved….’‘

  • In your book, your lawyers say there is no evidence against you.

  • No evidence against you?  Did you read your own book?

  • In your book, you reference the missing sweater (Filomena saw you wear that day), but it still was never found.

  • In your book, you mentioned the writings (you said you would kill for a pizza)

  • In your book, you claim the blood on the faucet was from your pierced ears.  (According to Barbia Badeau, your mother said the blood was from your period).

  • In your book, you acknowledge Raffaele took away your alibi.

  • In your book, you claim that Guede backs your alibi, but refutes Sollecito, which doesn’t make sense if you were together.

  • In your book, you say you were there. (You claim it meant RS apartment), yet you let PL remain in prison.

  • In your book, you admit writing a letter (you claim it was misinterpreted), claiming that Raffaele killed Meredith and planted your fingerprints.

  • In your book, you sarcastically admit you were the last person to wash up in a bloody bathroom.

  • In your book, (the Matteini decision) you say that the prosecution had stacked so much evidence Guede’s testimony wouldn’t have mattered.

  • In your book, you mention the police arresting the wrong people, but hypocritically, omit your false accusation of PL

  • In your book, you reference Meredith’s DNA on the knife (which RS claimed was during a cooking accident)

  • In your book, you reference your bloody footprints

  • In your book, you reference the bra clasp having Raffaele’s DNA

  • In your book, you acknowledge claims of a partial crime scene cleanup.

  • And we still haven’t gotten to those pesky statements you wrote and signed.

  • No evidence against you?

#258 [Chapter 23, Page 274] ‘’ ... I felt the way about Guede that Meredith’s family felt about me. As soon as I saw him, in a subsequent hearing, I thought angrily, You! You killed Meredith! He didn’t look like a murderer. He was wearing jeans and a sweater. It was almost impossible to imagine that he had cut Meredith’s throat. But if he hadn’t, his DNA wouldn’t have been everywhere in Meredith’s room. And he wouldn’t have lied about Raffaele and me. The other thing I noticed: he wouldn’t look at me….’‘

  • Why would you feel angry?  You said in court you only knew her for a month.

  • He didn’t look like a murderer?  Don’t you keep repeating that you are not the type of person to do this.

  • It is difficult to imagine he cut Meredith’s throat?  Right, because you knew before the police did that her throat was cut.

  • There were traces of Guede’s DNA, but it was not everywhere.  And you omit your own DNA mixed with Meredith’s

  • He wouldn’t have lied about you? Well, you lied to Judge Nencini in your email, and claimed you never met Guede.

#259 [Chapter 23, Page 275] ‘’ ... The prosecution spun this assumption further. According to Mignini, we found Meredith at the villa and said, Hey, that stupid bitch. Let’s show Meredith. Let’s get her to play a sex game. I was horrified. Who thinks like that? In their scenario, I hated Meredith because we’d argued about money. Hearing Mignini say that I told Guede to rape Meredith was upsetting. He added that I was the ringleader, telling Raffaele to hold her down. When he said that I threatened Meredith with a knife, I felt as if I’d been kicked. Even worse was hearing him say that when Meredith refused to have sex, I killed her…’

  • Again, prosecutors never said it was a sex game.

  • Who thinks like that? Well, who stages a break in on her Seattle roomies for fun?

  • Hearing Mignini say you told Guede to rape Meredith was upsetting?  Didn’t you publish a rape story on MySpace?

  • You were the ringleader?  Well, you arranged the ‘‘break-in’’ in Seattle.  You have leadership skills

#260 [Chapter 23, Page 276] ‘’ ... Starting right after we were indicted, Raffaele’s and my lawyers had requested the raw data for all Stefanoni’s forensic tests. How were the samples collected? How many cotton pads had her team used to swab the bathroom sink and the bidet? How often had they changed gloves? What tests had they done—and when? Which machines had they used, at what times, and on which days? What were the original unedited results of the DNA tests?

  • Her response was “No. We can’t give you these documents you continue to ask for, because the ones you have will have to suffice.”

  • If this were actually true, it would be grounds to open up the case.  Did you actually appeal on these grounds?

  • Interestingly, lawyers for you, Sollecito, and Guede all refused to attend the testings, but later claimed contamination.

#261 [Chapter 23, Page 279] ‘’ ... I was morbidly curious about Guede and simultaneously completely repulsed. Mostly I was disappointed. I had thought we’d have the chance to confront him. But he let his lawyers do all the talking…’‘

  • You only testified at trial with strict protections as to what topics would be covered.  Your lawyers constantly interrupted.

  • Raffaele never took the witness stand at trial.

  • You never took the stand at the 2011 Hellmann appeal

  • Raffaele never took the witness stand at the 2011 Hellmann appeal.

  • You refused to attend the 2013/2014 Florence appeal.

  • Raffaele refused to take the witness stand at the 2013/2014 Florence appeal.

  • You were refusing to attend the 2015 Cassation appeal.

  • Yet… Guede let his lawyers do all the talking?  Pot, meet kettle.

#262 [Chapter 23, Page 279] ‘’ ... “Isn’t that possible?” Biscotti asked. “Isn’t that what the evidence shows? It shows him being there, and he’s admitted to that. He says he left because he was scared. Of course he was scared! He’s a young black man, living the best he could, abandoned by his parents. He stole sometimes, but out of necessity. I don’t think there’s enough evidence to say that he killed. The knife has Amanda’s DNA, and the bra clasp has Raffaele’s. Rudy admits that he was there, he tells what happened, and I believe him.” No witnesses were called for Guede. His lawyers could only interpret the evidence the prosecution had provided. They argued that his DNA had been found at the crime scene because he was scrambling to help Meredith and that he left because he was afraid. I remember his lawyer saying Guede didn’t go to the disco to give himself an alibi but to let off steam. He escaped to Germany because he was worried that he’d be wrongly accused….’‘

  • It’s too bad Guede didn’t have the money and PR to proclaim his innocence the way you did.

#263 [Chapter 23, Page 280] ‘’ ... Still, there were reasons to be worried. Because the prosecution was withholding information, there was evidence I couldn’t refute: the knife, my “bloody” footprints, Raffaele’s DNA on Meredith’s bra clasp. And how would we fight the prosecution’s claim that we’d cleaned up the crime scene? I went to sleep every night telling myself that it would work out because we were innocent—and because it was so clear that Guede was guilty and lying. My lawyers argued exhaustively that Meredith and I had been friends—that there was no animosity between us. They argued that we had no connection to Guede, that Kokomani was a lunatic. But the case hinged on DNA, not on logic…’‘

  • What is the prosecution withholding?  It seems they released very powerful evidence.

  • Accusing prosecutors of withholding evidence, if false, is calunnia.  Don’t you ever learn?

  • It was so clear Guede was lying?  Well, you would know better than anyone, except maybe Raffy.

  • Your lawyers argued exhaustively you and Meredith were friends?  Why wouldn’t you just testify to that? Oh, right, cross examination.

  • Also, why wouldn’t any of Meredith’s other friends testify to how things were between you?  Oh, right, they did.

  • Murder cases often do hinge on DNA, and not lawyerly logic.  Good point.

#264 [Chapter 23, Page 281] ‘’ ... When the prosecution rested their case, Mignini demanded a life sentence for Guede and a full trial for Raffaele and me. After the judge retired to his chambers, we were each taken to a different empty office in the courthouse to wait for his decision. Raffaele folded a page from that day’s newspaper into a flower, which the guards brought to me. But I was focused on Guede, who was being held in the room next to mine. I could hear him talking with the guards, cracking jokes, and chuckling. I was fuming! I wanted to beat on the wall and tell him to shut up. His nonchalance incensed me. I thought, Does no one else feel this?...’‘

  • His nonchalance?  Were you not the one flirting with people in court?

  • Were you not the one wearing the ‘‘ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE’’ shirt to court?

  • Rested their case?  Listening to ABC or CNN, I thought there was no evidence against you.

#265 [Chapter 23, Page 282] ‘’ ... I entered the courtroom. I could barely walk. Judge Micheli read Guede’s verdict first: Guilty for the sexual assault and murder of Meredith Kercher, with a sentence of thirty years. The verdict didn’t surprise me at all—for a second, I was enormously relieved. I thought, He’s the one who did it. The judge’s delivery was so flat he could have been reading the ingredients off a box of bran flakes. Still, my chest clenched when I heard “thirty years.” Not because I pitied Guede. I’d been so focused on whether he would be found guilty or innocent, I hadn’t thought about the length of his sentence. I was twenty-one; thirty years was more time than I’d been alive—by a lot. I breathed in. “The court orders that Knox, Amanda, and Sollecito, Raffaele, be sent to trial.” I broke down in huge, gulping sobs. I’d made a heartfelt plea—“I’m telling you I’m innocent! I’m sorry for any of the confusion I’ve contributed.” The judge hadn’t believed me….’‘

  • Just to be clear on this: Guede’s 30 year sentence was the MAXIMUM the judge could hand down in a short-form trial.

  • Was your chest clenched, because you weren’t sure how merciful the judge(s) might be in this case?

  • Maybe if you had actually testified, you might be believed a bit more.

  • The confusion you caused?  Getting an innocent man locked up is more than just confusion.

  • It surprised you that the judge didn’t believe you?  You listed so much evidence against you just in this book.

#266 [Chapter 24, Page 286] ‘’ ... “Spiegare che cosa?” I asked, baffled. “Explain what?” I could see that the headline said something about me. “It’s an interview,” she said. “It talks about Cera.” “You know I don’t give interviews!” I said. The inspector turned the paper around so I could read the article. The reporter claimed to have interviewed my mother, who talked about things I’d said. “You need to tell your mother to refrain from speaking about the inner workings of the prison,” the ispettore said sternly. “My mom would never do that!” I screeched. “She only gives interviews to talk about my innocence. She would never reveal our private conversations.” But the article was full of insider information. They’d gotten Cera’s name and certain details right. They said she kissed me once and that I feared further sexual harassment. They knew she was a cleaning fanatic and that she wouldn’t let me make coffee because it would leave water spots on the sink….’‘

#267 [Chapter 24, Page 287] ‘’ ... Cera had been the one to tell me how mean, how crazy, how awful, prisoners could be to one another. I hadn’t wanted to believe her, and I’d promised myself that I’d never become bitter like she was. But I was getting closer. I refused to become so cynical and angry that I felt spite, but my natural hopefulness was flagging….’ The only place I found peace was inside my own head. I started expecting nothing. The one thing that surprised me was the occasional time another prisoner, like Fanta, treated me kindly. As excruciating as this was, it forced me to develop a sense of independence, a faith in myself.

  • Really?  You claim you are innocent, yet you have been in jail a year, have just had Judge Micheli (at pretrial), send you off to trial, and you’re hopefulness is flagging?  Why is that?  You thought you’d be able to lie your way out of it?

  • Innocent people wrongfully in jail would be pissed off.  You aren’t.  Why?

#268 [Chapter 24, Page 287] ‘’ ... Don Saulo was the one person who cared about any of us. In spite of the awful way the other prisoners treated me, he restored some of my faith in humankind. “It doesn’t matter what people think you did,” he told me. “What matters is what you did do.  Don’t worry if people can’t see your goodness. The only important thing is your conscience. You have to take heart and strength in that.”

  • Father Saulo, normally that is good advice, but what happens if the person doesn’t have a conscience?

#269 [Chapter 24, Page 287] ‘’ ... We held onto the belief that the law would be on my side when my trial started. I was innocent. No matter how the prosecution misconstrued things, there would never be evidence enough to convict me. And I had the great consolation of knowing that prison wasn’t my world. In time, I’d be set free. I could survive this as long as it took.  But I never thought it would take years….’‘

  • The law on your side?  The law isn’t supposed to be on anyone’s side.  It is supposed to apply to all.

  • The prosecution didn’t twist anything.  They gave you every chance to explain things.

  • There would never be enough evidence?  Did you read any of the earlier chapters in your book?

  • (Chapter 13) you mention a LONG list of what you and Raffaele talked about, but don’t remember if you read or had sex?

  • (Chapter 17) you reference the missing sweater (Filomena saw you wear that day), but it still was never found.

  • (Chapter 17) you mentioned the writings (you said you would kill for a pizza).

  • (Chapter 18) you claim the blood on the faucet was from your pierced ears.  (According to Barbie Nadeau, your mother said the blood was from your period).

  • (Chapter 18) you acknowledge Raffaele took away your alibi.

  • (Chapter 19) you claim that Guede backs your alibi, but refutes Sollecito, which doesn’t make sense if you were together.

  • (Chapter 19) you acknowledge the knife with your DNA on the handle, Meredith’s on the blade—the infamous double DNA knife.

  • (Chapter 20) you say you were there. (You claim it meant RS apartment), yet you let PL remain in prison.

  • (Chapter 20) you admit writing a letter (you claim it was misinterpreted), claiming that Raffaele killed Meredith and planted your fingerprints.

  • (Chapter 21) you reference RS DNA on the bra clasp but saying it does not implicate you directly.

  • (Chapter 21) you admit (and I believe this), that much of your knowledge comes from crime TV.

  • (Chapter 21) you sarcastically admit you were the last person to wash up in a bloody bathroom.

  • (Chapter 21)—the Matteini decision—you say that the prosecution had stacked so much evidence Guede’s testimony wouldn’t have mattered.

  • (Chapter 22) you mention the police arresting the wrong people, but hypocritically, omit your false accusation of PL.

  • (Chapter 22) you reference Meredith’s DNA on the knife (which RS claimed was during a cooking accident).

  • (Chapter 22) you reference your bloody footprints, and mentioned Raffaele’s

  • (Chapter 23) you reference the bra clasp having Raffaele’s DNA

  • (Chapter 23) you acknowledge claims of a partial crime scene cleanup.

  • (Chapter 25) you acknowledge Filomena testifies you brought other ‘‘friends’’ to the house.

  • (Chapter 25) you acknowledge the cut on your neck, which you claim was a hickey.

  • (Chapter 25) you acknowledge telling the police Meredith always locked her door, though you try to spin it.

  • (Chapter 25) you acknowledge your cellphone and Raffaele’s were turned off, though you give different reasons why.

  • How much evidence does the prosecution need?  These notes all came from YOUR book. THIS BOOK.

#270 [Chapter 24, Page 288] ‘’ ... The only place I found peace was inside my own head. I started expecting nothing. The one thing that surprised me was the occasional time another prisoner, like Fanta, treated me kindly. As excruciating as this was, it forced me to develop a sense of independence, a faith in myself….’‘

  • You developed a sense of independence?  By relying on your family to clean up your mess?

  • You could find more peace if you would own up to what you did to Meredith.

#271 [Chapter 25, Page 289] ‘’ ... The pretrial had been like the first reading of a play. No costumes, no audience, no reporters, and very few players. It was held in chambers and closed to the press. The lawyers wore suits. Only two witnesses—the prosecution’s DNA analyst and a man who claimed to have seen Rudy Guede, Raffaele, and me together—testified….’‘

  • I hope you are being sarcastic here.  The pretrial was like the first reading of a play?  This is a murder case, not some theatre production.

  • Really?  None of the police officers (whom you accused of police brutality), testified here?

  • Really?  None of the CSI’s from the home, only the DNA guy, testified?

  • You still could have testified on your own behalf, if this was a misunderstanding. Why didn’t you?

#272 [Chapter 25, Page 289] ‘’ ... The full trial for Raffaele and me was like opening night. I wasn’t prepared for the spectacle…’‘

  • Again, this is a murder case, not a theatre.

  • Although, if you are this detached from reality, is that why you wore the ‘‘ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE’’ shirt?

#273 [Chapter 25, Page 289] ‘’ ... Three no-nonsense guards—one in front of me and one on either side—led me in through the door in the back of the packed courtroom. Police officers, including some who had interrogated me fourteen months before, were lined up against the back wall. I knew that almost every observer thought I was guilty and wanted me to suffer….’‘

  • The police didn’t interrogate you.  You were giving a witness summary, until you were informed Raffaele removed your alibi.  You then proceeded (without provocation), to try to frame Patrick, and it backfired.

  • 14 months ago, and now you are at trial?  Wow, that seems a bit faster than the U.S. and Canadian systems.

  • They don’t want you to suffer, they want to know exactly what happened to Meredith.

#274 [Chapter 25, Page 290] ‘’ ... I knew I wasn’t alone. I gave them a little wave and a big smile to let them know how glad I was they were there. I never anticipated that that smile would be reported as “Amanda Knox beamed as she was led into an Italian court.” And the Daily Mail amped up my regular walk: “She made her entrance like a Hollywood diva sashaying along the red carpet.” I don’t know if the reporting was skewed to sell papers or if the presumption of my guilt colored the way the reporters saw me. Anyone reading or watching the TV reports would have come away believing the girl called Foxy Knoxy was amoral, psychotic, and depraved…’‘

#275 [Chapter 25, Page 291] ‘’ ... In the United States, civil and criminal trials are held separately; in Italy, they’re combined. The Italians clearly believe their jurors can compartmentalize—the same eight people decide all the verdicts. Moreover, jury members are not screened for bias, nor guarded from outside influence. The government was trying Raffaele and me for five crimes: murder, illegally carrying a knife, rape, theft, simulating a robbery, and a sixth just for me: slander. The Kerchers, believing Raffaele and I had killed their daughter, were suing both of us for €5 million—about $6.4 million—€1 million for each of Meredith’s five family members, to compensate for their loss and emotional anguish. Patrick Lumumba was suing me for slander for a yet to be determined amount. The owner of the villa was suing me for €10,000 for damages and lost rent….’‘

  • You are insulting, but there is a logic to it.  In the U.S., if someone were found guilty in a criminal case, often a civil one would follow.  Of course, not being convicted would make the civil case harder.

  • Jurors are screened for bias.  You are being blatantly dishonest—again.

  • You are being sued by the family of the woman you murdered, the man you tried to frame, and the homeowner whose property you damaged, and had turned into a crime scene.  Makes sense.



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